Canadian Constitution of 1982

Canadian Constitution of 1982

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A Constitution is document that states how a country is made. The growth of Canada can be interpreted through the Canadian Constitution, because the Constitution states the equal rights and freedoms of all Canadians, equal distribution of legislative powers, convenient education, and legal stability and accurate predictability. The Canadian Constitution is a very efficient way of looking at the laws and the maintenance of the country, because it describes the structure of Canada, it provides very well legal stability and predictability and the Constitution is very important for Canadians. The Canadian Constitution plays an effective role of determining the structure of Canada, its stability and predictability of laws and the rights and freedoms of Canadians.
The Constitution of Canada is very appropriate as it plays its role as a blueprint for the structure of Canada. According to section 91 of the Constitution Act, 1867, it says, “It shall be lawful for the queen, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate and House of Commons, to make laws for the peace, order, and good government of Canada…” [laws-lois.justice.gc.ca]. The structure of Canada and the powers of the Parliament can be easily identified through this law. As it is said, the Parliament can only make laws with the advice and consent of the Senate and House of Commons regarding peace, order and the government of Canada, which is fair and appropriate. Furthermore, as said in section 92 of the Constitution of Canada, it says, “In each province the legislature may exclusively make laws in relation to matters coming within the classes of subjects next hereinafter enumerated; that is to say, - direct taxation within the province in order to the raising of a revenue for provincial purposes, etc.” [laws-lois.justice.gc.ca]. It is a law regarding exclusive powers of Provincial Legislatures on the following topics. Having this law in place ensures that each part of the Legislature gets equal rights and powers making the Constitution very appropriate as a blueprint for the structure of Canada. In addition, in section 93, it states that, “In and for each province the legislature may exclusively make laws in relation to education, subject and according to the following provisions…” [laws-lois.justice.gc.ca]. It states that each Province’s Legislature can make laws in relation to education, subject according to the following necessities. This law balances the education in each province and further develops the overall structure of Canada.

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The Canadian Constitution is the basic life of Canada, because it details many laws starting from education to family law, that are fair to both the citizens and the government, making it a very appropriate piece of document that acts as a blueprint for the structure of Canada. Other than the appropriateness, the Canadian Constitution provides very well legal stability and predictability.
The Canadian Constitution of 1982 provides very well legal stability and predictability. According to section 40, under Compensation of the Constitution Act, 1982, it says, “Where an amendment is made under subsection… Canada shall provide reasonable compensation to any province to which the amendment does not apply.” [laws-loois.justice.gc.ca]. This law is in place, because if an amendment that transfers Provincial Legislative powers relating to education or other cultural matters from Provincial Legislatures to parliament, and if it does not apply, Canada must pay any of the provinces. This is a very important law, because it is fair to the victim (the province) and it is appropriate. This is an example of a law that stabilizes the Constitution. Additionally, in section 41, under the Procedure for Amending Constitution of Canada, it says, “An amendment to the Constitution of Canada in relation to the following matters may be made by proclamation issued by the Governor General under the Great Seal of Canada only where authorized...” [laws-lois.justice.gc.ca]. This law states that the Canadian Constitution can only be changed on the following matters that can be made by proclamation issued by the Governor General under the Great Seal of Canada by resolutions of the Senate and House of Commons. This law activates the overall stability of the Constitution. Through this law, Canadians can predict that the Constitution could not be changed that easily. Furthermore, according to section 42 of the Constitution, it says, “An amendment to the Constitution of Canada in relation to the following matters may be made only in accordance with subsection 38.” [law-lois.justice.gc.ca]. This ensures that the changes of the following matters can only be made by proclamation given by the House of Commons from the Governor General under the Great Seal of Canada. This law is a very powerful law that gives a strict and a difficult order. From reading this law, citizens can tell that changes to this law would result in disagreements between the citizens and the government and it would be difficult to change the law. Not only does the Canadian Constitution provide very well legal stabilities and predictability of its laws, it is also important for Canadians as it contains the rights and freedoms for the citizens.
The Canadian Constitution is very important for Canadians due to the rights and freedoms the Charter of Rights and Freedoms contains. According to section 15, under Equality Rights, it says, “Every individual is equal before and under the law and has the right to the equal protection and equal benefit of the law without discrimination and, in particular, without discrimination based on race, national or ethnic origin, colour, religion, sex, age or mental or physical disability.” [laws-lois.justice.gc.ca]. This law is very important to Canadians, because it states the basic rights and freedoms of all Canadians and thus making the Constitution very important for Canadians. Furthermore, as said in section 2 under the Charter of Rights and Freedoms, of the Constitution Act, it says, “Everyone has the freedom of conscience and religion, freedom of thought, belief, opinion, and expression, including freedom of the press and other media of communication, peaceful assembly, and association.” [law-lois.justice.gc.ca]. This law showcases the essential freedoms of all Canadians, which is very important for all citizens to remember and act according to it. It also triggers attention regarding disagreements between the government and the citizens relating to the law, making the Constitution Act very important to the Canadian society and its citizens. Similarly, in section 6, under Mobility Rights, of the Canadian Constitution, it says, “Every citizen of Canada has the right to enter, remain in, and leave Canada.” [laws-lois.justice.gc.ca]. This law is the freedom of movement that Canada gives to every one of its citizens; it effectively gives Canadians the ultimate right to move around freely without much disruptions. Therefore, this law is very important to Canadians, making the Constitution of Canada very important to Canadians as well.
The Canadian Constitution plays an outstanding role of determining the structure of Canada, its stability and predictability of laws and the rights and freedoms of Canadians. The Constitution of Canada is very appropriate as it plays its role as a blueprint for the structure of Canada, it provides very well legal stabilities and predictability, and it is very important for Canadians due to the rights and freedoms it contains. Laws are very important in developing and running a democratic and a busy country like Canada. Similarly, the Canadian Constitution is needed in everyday court cases and everyday life.




Works Cited

Department of Justice Canada "Constitution Acts, 1867 to 1982." 2011-02-24. Web. 27 Feb 2011. .
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