Can a Cardboard Boat Float? Essay

Can a Cardboard Boat Float? Essay

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As surprising as it may seem, one of the most common household items, cardboard, can be used to construct a boat. Building a cardboard boat has become a fun activity that anyone can take part in. Towns and schools hold annual cardboard boat regattas, judging the entrants on speed, design, and creativity. In New Richmond, Ohio there is even a cardboard boat museum! These special boats are more than just a box thrown into water; they are designed using elements of engineering and physics to make them not only water ready, but fast and durable. Building cardboard boats is an exciting way to incorporate topics studied in the classroom into a fun learning experience.
The first boats were used in very ancient times. The earliest boats were log boats, or dugouts, that were boats made from a hallowed tree. These boats date all the way back to the Stone Age nearly 10,000 years ago. A short while after 3000 B.C., the Egyptians and the Mesopotamians used boats for traveling along the Nile River. The Egyptians made cotton sail that they used to take some of the workload off of oarsmen. In 1200 B.C., the Phoenicians and Greeks were the most seafaring people along the Mediterranean. They constructed massive cargo ships and put two large masts on them. They were around 100 foot long and could carry 150 tons. The Romans become the dominant rulers of the sea in 100 B.C. They made merchant ships nearly 200 feet long that could carry 1000 tons, as well as human passengers. These boats were often overcrowded because the lower level was usually filled with trade, which made for close quarters. The Vikings conquered the sea in 100 B.C. in their boats, known as longships. These ships were the main naval vessel of the Scandinavians. T...


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... largest flute, used in big boxes, makes a sturdier box that can be stacked. The strongest corrugated cardboard is triple wall corrugated cardboard, constructed with four sheets of carton board and three sheets of corrugated board. This cardboard is used to package large items. (Walker)
Building a cardboard boat can be a fun and challenging hands on learning experience incorporating knowledge gained across the many aspects go into building the best boats. Choosing the right boat design and the appropriate cardboard can be the difference in having a great boat or sinking in your ship. Based on history, we know who designed the best boats. We can build on their ideas and strategies to construct an even better boat. Cardboard boats are something that in the future could be integrated into the classroom as a challenging, yet fun learning experience for everyone.


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Essay about Can A Cardboard Boat Float

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