Cameron's Crusade by Daniel Hannan Essays

Cameron's Crusade by Daniel Hannan Essays

Length: 949 words (2.7 double-spaced pages)

Rating: Better Essays

Open Document

Essay Preview

The context of today's society is one of increased pressure to bow to culturally diverse traditions and principles. Although this movement has had a positive effect in its admonishment of bigotry and racism, it has presented a conundrum regarding the best way to manage issues that stem from a clash of cultures. On February 5, 2011, British Prime Minister David Cameron gave a speech at the Munich Security Conference, drawing attention to failure of “state multi-culturalism.” His speech has prompted debate world-wide and inspired numerous articles both defending and denouncing the Prime Minister's views. "Cameron's Crusade," written by Daniel Hannan, a member of the European Parliament, makes a cogent argument in support of Cameron's speech. Hannan uses a strong, authoritative tone, which waxes sardonic when discussing those he terms as "multicultural," but assumes an agreement with the readership. He also provides examples of the dangers seen in a society overly sensitive towards cultural disparity. Emphasis is kept, however, on the idea that the multi-cultural dilemma is one of integration, not immigration, to sidestep the inevitable accusation of racism. Finally, Hannan characterizes the opposing sides of the argument through a few key words, using their associations to implant a favorable opinion of his viewpoint in the mind of the reader. Likely the first observation made when reading the article is how Hannan uses a very cutting, sarcastic style when discussing those he deems members of the “multi-culti apparatus.” With his opening statement, “the shocking thing is that anyone should have been shocked,” he sets the tone of the article right away and clearly identifies his position: that the Prime Minister's remarks were common...


... middle of paper ...


...icalize[s] second-generation immigrants.” In other words, people who would have been content in the society which they were born into, if not for the fact that that society allows itself to be denigrated in the name of cultural sensitivity. His example in this case appeals not to the protective instinct, but to the fear of terrorism. Hannan's position is that multiculturalism has, in fact, vilified western culture, and romanticized the terrorist agenda. Fear is a strong motivator for change; if a writer can instill fear of thing in someone else, he or she will find it easier to convince that person that something must be done to eliminate that thing. The threat of increased terrorism, which he implicitly links to the rise of multiculturalism, is a tool that Hannan uses to sway readers by appealing to their own self-interests, rather than the well-being of strangers.

Need Writing Help?

Get feedback on grammar, clarity, concision and logic instantly.

Check your paper »

Cameron's Crusade Essay

- The context of today's society is one of increased pressure to bow to culturally diverse traditions and principles. Although this movement has had a positive effect in its admonishment of bigotry and racism, it has presented a conundrum regarding the best way to manage issues that stem from a clash of cultures. On February 5, 2011, British Prime Minister David Cameron gave a speech at the Munich Security Conference, drawing attention to failure of “state multi-culturalism.” His speech has prompted debate world-wide and inspired numerous articles both defending and denouncing the Prime Minister's views....   [tags: Article Analysis ]

Better Essays
1758 words (5 pages)

The First Crusade And The Crusade Essay

- In 1095, Pope Urban II called the first crusade. Happening between 1096 and 1099, the first crusade was both a military expedition and a mass movement of people with the simple goal of reclaiming the Holy Lands taken by the Muslims in their conquests of the Levant. The crusade ended with the capture of Jerusalem in July 1099. However, there has been much debate about whether the First Crusade can be considered an ‘armed pilgrimage’ or whether it has to be considered as a holy war. This view is complicated due to the ways in which the Crusade was presented and how the penitential nature of it changed throughout the course of the Crusade....   [tags: Crusades, First Crusade, Alexios I Komnenos]

Better Essays
1510 words (4.3 pages)

The World Of The First Crusade Essay

- The First Crusade was well known for their main goal for the European Christians to regain the sacred city of Jerusalem. Before the First Crusades became to be, they were knights at first because they had sworn a vow to successfully reach Jerusalem and were granted taking of the cross or the crux that would be with them in the entire journey. In 1095, Alexius sent mail to the pope to request mercenaries to protect them from the Muslim Invaders. That’s when the pope decided to assist Alexius, to regain some lost territory that’s when Pope decided he wanted to send the European knights to Jerusalem....   [tags: First Crusade, Crusades, Jerusalem]

Better Essays
1080 words (3.1 pages)

The Primary Purpose Of The First Crusade Essay

- The Primary Purpose of the First Crusade The history of the Crusades in the early parts of the 11th century is one that was filled with battles fraught with much adversity and hardship, along with their shares of success in accomplishing the church’s goal of reclaiming as much control over the Holy Land as possible. The First Crusade is no exception to this. This campaign had a very specific objective laid out by the church, which was successfully accomplished and equally brought some control back to the church as future crusades did....   [tags: Crusades, First Crusade, Christianity]

Better Essays
1428 words (4.1 pages)

The First Crusade Of 1095 Essay

- ... People participated in crusades to gain privileges. Participating in the crusades granted families privileges such as church protection, property, interest repayments on debt and more. To gain these privileges, people had to swear a vow to an adoption of a cross, be blessed by a priest, and have the symbol be shown on clothing. In total, between 50,000 and 70,000 men had reached Asia Minor in the participation of the First Crusade with the motivation to spread their religion and conquer territory....   [tags: First Crusade, Crusades, Kingdom of Jerusalem]

Better Essays
1245 words (3.6 pages)

The First Crusade Was Called By Pope Urban II Essay

- ... Later Crusades would prove to be a failure or pointless. However, there were some innovations that took place because of the Crusades. One innovation that came about was the unprecedented burst of historical writing that emerged after the capture of Jerusalem. This was an age of rising literacy and the creation and circulation of crusade texts was a big part of this movement. Commercial, scientific, and cultural exchanges took place as a result of the Crusades. Despite the violence of the Crusades, Middle Eastern and European cultures influenced one another....   [tags: Crusades, First Crusade, Islam]

Better Essays
722 words (2.1 pages)

The Fourth Crusade Essay

- The Fourth Crusade Is karma the reason for the slow but evident sinking of Venice into the Mediterranean. Maybe it is indemnity for the cruel selfish acts of Venice during the Fourth Crusade. The Venetians along with crusaders robbed Constantinople for personal gains. The Fourth Crusade should be an example that it is crude and unjust to attack fellow men for no reason. The Crusades were a series of battles and short wars against the Muslims. In the eleventh century Jerusalem had been taken over by the Turks....   [tags: History, The Crusades]

Better Essays
1541 words (4.4 pages)

The First Crusade Essay

- The First Crusade What was the cause for Western Europe to implement the Crusades. To answer this, we must go back the 11th century when the Seljuk Turks made their presence known in the east by conquering Armenia, Syria, and Palestine. They soon moved on to Jerusalem where they burned down Christian churches and murdered the clergy and many Christian pilgrims visiting there. Byzantium quickly saw the Seljuk Turks as a threat, and in 1071, met them at the Battle of Manzikert in Asia Minor. The Byzantines were slaughtered and it would not be long until the Seljuk Turks closed in on Constantinople....   [tags: Crusade Religion History]

Free Essays
940 words (2.7 pages)

Movie Analysis of Titanic Directed by James Cameron Essay examples

- Movie Analysis of Titanic Directed by James Cameron The movie Titanic, directed by James Cameron, was a fictional story based on the true ship, Titanic. Cameron's movie was based on a love story; however, the focus of this paper will be on some of the differences between the two classes aboard the Titanic. This movie clearly portrayed how differently the first and second-class people were treated during the time of the Titanic. This can be related to many other times in American history when groups were segregated as well....   [tags: Titanic James Cameron Movies Film Essays]

Better Essays
918 words (2.6 pages)

Flowers for Algernon by Daniel Keyes Essays

- Flowers for Algernon by Daniel Keyes is a classic science fiction set in southeastern New York, New York City. The fictitious prose traces a man's inner psychological journey within from a world of retardation to a world of great intelligence. Narrated through a series of empirical "Progress Reports", Flowers for Algernon follows the intellectual and emotional rise and fall of Charlie Gordon, a young man born with an unusually low Intelligence Quotient (IQ), as he becomes the first human pilot-study for an ambitious brain experiment....   [tags: Flowers Algernon Daniel Keyes]

Better Essays
1110 words (3.2 pages)