Essay on Call Home by Barbara Kingsvolver

Essay on Call Home by Barbara Kingsvolver

Length: 1391 words (4 double-spaced pages)

Rating: Strong Essays

Open Document

Essay Preview


Summary and Response to Barbara Kingsolver’s “Called Home”
In “Called Home”, the first chapter of the book Animal, Vegetable, Miracle: A Year in Food Life, Barbara Kingsolver presents her concerns about America's lack of food knowledge, sustainable practices, and food culture. Kingsolver introduces her argument for the benefits of adopting a local food culture by using statistics, witty anecdotal evidence, and logic to appeal to a wide casual reading audience. Her friendly tone and trenchant criticism of America's current food practices combine to deliver a convincing argument that a food culture would improve conditions concerning health and sustainability. I agree with Kingsolver that knowing the origin of food is an important and healthy benefit of developing a true food culture, but it is impractical to maintain that everyone is able to buy more expensive food. Kingsolver presents a compelling argument for developing a food culture, however this lifestyle change may not be practical or even possible for a poverty-level citizen. The following essay will summarize and respond to Kingsolver’s argument to demonstrate how “Called Home” is a model for novice social scientists.
From the very beginning of the chapter, Kingsolver claims that the majority of Americans are ignorant of the process of food production, and that this ignorance hinders their ability to understand the natural systems of the Earth. To support this claim she introduces multiple instances of anecdotal evidence. One particular example of this anecdotal evidence is the comparison Kingsolver makes between the cashier of the gas station and the appalachian waitress. The gas cashier did not want it to rain even though Kingsolver’s hometown of Tucson, Arizona was ex...


... middle of paper ...


...College students are the next generation of food consumers just starting to purchase and prepare their own food, setting purchasing habits that will follow them into their lives as they start their own careers. These habits will shape what food is in demand, and therefore what food is produced. Not only do college students hold financial power over the future economy, but they must make the decision of whether to become the next unhealthy generation, that will also indoctrinate their children to accept the level of food quality that is currently labeled as junk food as a standard level quality of food.






Works Cited

Kingsolver, Barbara, Steven L. Hopp, and Camille Kingsolver. "Called Home." Animal, Vegetable,
Miracle: A Year of Food Life. New York: HarperCollins, 2007. 1-22. Print.
This is the text that I extracted all quotes from, and summarized in my paper.

Need Writing Help?

Get feedback on grammar, clarity, concision and logic instantly.

Check your paper »

Essay about Transformations in "The Bean Trees" by Barbara Kingsolver

- When thinking of birds, visualizing them building their nests in cacti certainly isn't the first thing that comes to mind. In the book, The Bean Trees by Barbara Kingsolver, metaphorically everyone is constantly building their nests in cacti, and evolving from their experiences. From living in attics to taking trips across the country with no destination, characters in this book don't live what society considers the “conventional American lifestyle.” Growing and thriving in unexpected and unusual places and ways is nothing but average throughout the book....   [tags: The Bean Trees, Barbara Kingsolver]

Strong Essays
1418 words (4.1 pages)

Taylor's Life Choices in "The Bean Trees" by Barbara Kingsolver Essay

- In The Bean Trees by Barbara Kingsolver, protagonist Taylor Greer is not your average teenage girl from Pittman, Kentucky. Taylor refuses to remain in her hometown forever, which only leads to teenage pregnancy and motherhood until death. On a mission to escape Pittman’s stereotypical teenage girl image, she buys a ‘55 Volkswagen and embarks on a journey west. Just when she thinks she is home free, Taylor is left with an abandoned three-year-old American Indian girl. Ironically, Taylor ends up as an unplanned single mother....   [tags: Bean Trees, Barbara Kingsolver, ]

Strong Essays
777 words (2.2 pages)

Carol Stack’s Call to Home Essay

- Progress and individualism are very much celebrated in American culture. Many people migrate to urban cities in the search of economic prosperity and to achieve the elusive “American Dream.” City life can often come as a shock to individuals not accustomed to a fast-paced lifestyle; conversely it can change a person. Such change can transform a person to lose the values and beliefs they were raised with which consequently attribute to losing the bonds that they once held with their families. This is not the case with the families portrayed in Carol Stack’s ethnography Call to Home....   [tags: Call to Home Essay]

Strong Essays
1441 words (4.1 pages)

Barbara Kingsolver's The Bean Trees Essay

- Barbara Kingsolver's The Bean Trees It has often been suggested that some southwestern literature is based on the experiences of others. With this suggestion, it has been demonstrated that these experiences are incorporated with the intention of portraying the experiences of others as a learning tool; for both the reader and the writer. Some may also imply that literature, therefore, may impose a learning opportunity in itself. In correspondence with this belief, it must be suggested that the classic novel, The Bean Trees, could be considered a learning experience for the audience as well as Barbara Kingsolver in relation to the catalyzing character Marietta "Missy"/Taylor Greer along with...   [tags: Barbara Kingsolver Bean Trees Character Analysis]

Free Essays
1057 words (3 pages)

Motherhood in Barbara Kingsolver's The Bean Trees Essay

- Motherhood in The Bean Trees In the novel, The Bean Trees, by Barbara Kingsolver, we watch as Taylor grows a great deal. This young woman takes on a huge commitment of caring for a child that doesn't even belong to her. The friends that she acquired along the way help teach her about love and responsibility, and those friends become family to her and Turtle. Having no experience in motherhood, she muddles through the best she can, as all mothers do. Marietta was raised in a small town in Kentucky....   [tags: Kingsolver Bean Trees Essays]

Free Essays
757 words (2.2 pages)

Balancing the Individual with the Community in Barbara Kingsolver's The Bean Trees

-     In an interview with Barbara Kingsolver by David Gergen, editor-at-large for U.S. News & World Report, Kingsolver states, I think everything I write is about the idea of community and about the special challenge in the United States of balancing our idealization of the individual, or glorification of, of personal freedom and the individual with the importance of community, how to balance those two offices. (Qtd. by Gergen) I found this idea of Kingsolver's to be the basis of her book The Bean Trees....   [tags: Kingsolver Bean Trees Essays]

Free Essays
2143 words (6.1 pages)

The Growth of Marietta in Barbara Kingsolver's The Bean Trees Essay

- The Growth of Marietta in The Bean Trees Barbara Kingsolver, in the novel The Bean Trees, portrays the story of a young woman, Marietta Greer, learning about love, responsibility, friendship and the human condition. All of us can relate to the struggles of every day life; however, it is when we must deal with issues that we would rather run from that show our true character. Sooner or later, we all have to confront issues that life bestows on us.   Marietta embarks on her journey west in a 1955 Volkswagen with a pledge to get away from Kentucky....   [tags: Kingsolver Bean Trees Essays]

Strong Essays
722 words (2.1 pages)

Seeking Solace in Barbara Kingsolver's The Bean Trees Essay

- Seeking Solace in The Bean Trees Many aspects of life are explored in Barbara Kingsolver's novel, The Bean Trees. A young woman named Marietta Greer from Kentucky wanted to strike out on her own, leaving behind everything she ever knew, just to start a new life. Many children want to do this at an early age so they can experience life on their own yet they don't realize the dangers involved.. Everyone that leaves the solace of their own home needs loving support to keep them going through life....   [tags: Kingsolver Bean Trees Essays]

Free Essays
728 words (2.1 pages)

Essay on Self-discovery in Barbara Kingsolver’s Animal Dreams

- Self-discovery in Barbara Kingsolver’s Animal Dreams Although, on the surface, Animal Dreams is a book about family conflict, the central theme is about self-discovery. Animal Dreams by Barbara Kingsolver is a story about a family who lived in the town of Grace. The history behind Grace is very vivid and descriptive. The family that becomes the reader's concern, is the Noline family. The family members are Homero Noline and his daughters Cosima and Halimeda. Cosima or Codi, as she is known in the book, comes back to Grace after fourteen years....   [tags: Kingsolver Animal Dreams Essays]

Strong Essays
770 words (2.2 pages)

Nickel And Dimed by Barbara Ehrenreich Essay

- Nickel And Dimed by Barbara Ehrenreich Why should we be the ones to pay for someone to sit around at home. The answer is one simple word, welfare. There are many reasons why people mooch on welfare, rather than going out and working. The only jobs these people are qualified for are minimum wage jobs. As Barbara Ehrenreich, author of Nickel and Dimed, worked at minimum wage paying jobs and reported the hardships that people had to go through on a day-to-day basis. A critic responded by saying, “This is simply the case of an academic who is forced to get a real job…” Ehrenriech’s reasoning for joining the working-class is to report why people who mite be on welfare, continue to stay on welfar...   [tags: Barbara Ehrenreich Nickel Dimed]

Strong Essays
1376 words (3.9 pages)