The Buddhist Terms Anatta, Dukkha, Tanha, And Nirvana Essay

The Buddhist Terms Anatta, Dukkha, Tanha, And Nirvana Essay

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DeAnn Grove 

1. Describe the Buddhist terms anatta, anicca, dukkha, tanha, and Nirvana.  

As depicted in the story of Buddha, Siddartha, born of a virgin, was destined to
either be a great ruler or a great holy man. Living an isolated and luxurious life until he was 29, he decided to give up all his own worldly possessions, even his family, to begin his own journey. After seeing an old man, a sick man, a dead man, and lastly a holy man Siddartha desired to find the solution to end ALL human suffering. His enlightenment occurred when he sat under the Bodhi tree and experienced many visions, and to ultimately become Buddha. This when he began to teach the three characteristics of existence: dukkha (suffering), anicca (impermanence), and anatta (egolessness.)
Theravada Buddhism teaches of dukkha, which means suffering and dissatisfaction, and is the first of the four noble truths that Buddha taught. It is that ALL things suffer due to the need to find permanence or to recognize self when these do not exist. He taught there are three main categories of dukkha. The first is dukkha-dukkah, which is physical, emotional, and mental pain. Second being viparinama-dukkha, which is impermanence. The and last being samkhara-dukkha, that everything effects everything else. The Buddha teaches in the “The Four Noble Truths,” the path that is necessary to gain insight into understanding dukkha, its causes, and how to overcome them.
Such as in the second noble truth tanha, which is,” the cause of suffering is desire.”
It is the craving, desire, yearning to hold onto all that is pleasurable to self, in spite of having the knowledge that they are not permanent. And with this ignorance that cycle will continue causing dukkha. As B...


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...ons like Judaism and Christianity.  Which sect would you find more appealing and why?
I truly find Mahayana Buddhism more appealing do to the fact that it is much more liberal then Theravada Buddhism. Having to live a life of seclusion and the way to attain enlightenment is by freeing my “own” self. Seems to me a harder path to follow. I would rather follow the path of a Boddhisatva by finding enlightenment and inner peace by assisting others that are still suffering in the cycle of rebirth. Or even as a lay person I can still reach enlightenment and end the cycle of rebirth is very much more appealing.
Knowing that by living a clean spiritual life, by living a life of being compassionate to all, being able to live in the community, and either by teaching or by being taught that enlightenment can be attained in a single lifetime is what I would choose.


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