Essay about Buddhism Is The Foundation Of Natural Laws

Essay about Buddhism Is The Foundation Of Natural Laws

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Christianity believes in one God, which exists in three person; the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit. Mankind was created to have relationship with God. Faith and believe in Jesus can save individual from happening sin and eternal death. Buddhism is a religion that does not include the idea of worshipping a creator god. Buddhism believes in path of practice and spiritual development direct to insight into the actual nature of reality. According to Buddhism nothing is eternal, every action have results and change is possible. Practicing meditation helps change in individual life and develops qualities of awareness, kindness and wisdom.
What is Prime Reality?
God is the truth in Christianity. According to Sire (2009), “Prime reality is the infinite, personal God revealed in the Holy Scriptures. The God is triune, transcendent and immanent, omniscient sovereign and good”. The prime reality in Buddhism is “dharma” or “dhamma”, which is the foundation of natural laws. People can come out from their suffering condition by developing an awareness of reality. Buddhism addresses every difference between a person’s view of reality and the actual state of things.
What is the nature of the world around us?
Christian’s world view regarding nature is that the world we live is a gift from God. The nature world and environment around us is creative work of God. God has given us intelligence so that we can understand our surrounding. People should take care of nature for own benefits. Christian believes the spiritual home is heaven. Buddhism believes that air and water are invaluable gifts of nature. Changeability is one of the constant principles of nature. Natural process can affect by morals of human. Pollution of nature could bring severe t...


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...lear picture of individual’s needs.They should evaluate patient’s spiritual needs and incorporate those needs in the plan of care. While making plan of care some important aspects that needs to be address are diet preference, willing to see spiritual care giver, preference of caregiver based on sex, refusal of treatment etc. Following principle of respect is important to treat each individual fairly.
Conclusion
Health care provider should encourage patients and family members to interpret how religious values may be appropriate during hospital stay regarding their needs. Patient’s cultural, spiritual, faith and religious beliefs are important to incorporate in plan of care. Respect for patient values and belief Healing is the process of the restoration of health. Health care provider should not neglect his or her own psychological and spiritual well-being as well.

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