Booker T. Washington And Web Dubois Essay

Booker T. Washington And Web Dubois Essay

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In 1895, 30 years after the Civil War ended, African Americans still were not granted the rights they ever so desired. The Ku Klux Klan (KKK) has just died down after oppressing blacks for the first time causing African Americans as a whole to be fearful of the power whites held over our society. Confused and frightened on how to handle the state blacks were in, civil rights activist leaders Booker T. Washington and WEB Dubois began getting recognition from all US citizens due to their drastically different and distinctive ideologies. We as a nation were determined to combat the situation blacks were swirled in. With the nation being scared as to where black equality will lead the nation, Booker T. Washington and WEB Dubois create clashing ideals, which causes a divide between the society they live within.
With southerners desiring to simulate the past they recently lost, they stripped African Americans of their most basic human rights, and prevented them from having a voice in any form of politics within the South. They did so by forcing Africans to pass excessively hard literacy tests that would have been virtually impossible for any race to understand. Even if they did understand what was given to them, local law enforcement denied them of their rights because of their discriminatory convictions. Ben Tillman, senator of South Carolina between 1895-1918, even went on record stating
“We took the government away. We stuffed ballot boxes… We eliminated all of the colored people whom we could under the 14th and 15th amendment… we shot them in South Carolina when they come in competition with us in the matter if elections… You do not love them anymore than we do. You used to pretend you did, but you no longer pretend it, except to ...


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...hough there is no doubt today that Dubois’ beliefs were far more superior in the eyes of our modern American hindsight, they were simply too unrealistic for the civilization they lived in. With racism being a prevalent and rooted in the community whites lived in, the idea that Africans could be holding office for our nation was too much to bear at the time. On the other hand, if Washington’s ideals had become a reality, it would not be a surprise if the rights blacks warranted had been pushed back 10-20 years after they got them. Though white Americans loved the realistic standards Washington put out for the African American community, blacks simply refused to accept that this would be the world they would live within. Stuck in a perpetual dilemma on how to combat the issue, blacks were forced to live under societies conditions until the 1960’s civil rights movement.

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Booker T. Washington And Web Dubois Essay

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