Black People And The Deaf Community Essay

Black People And The Deaf Community Essay

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Black individuals are at a significant disadvantaged in the deaf community. They are hardly recognized for the influence on the Deaf community. The history of black Deaf individuals proves that they are a great asset to the deaf community. Black Deaf individuals should be given equitable opportunities because they will be able to benefit the deaf community even more.
I have strong contradictory biases in this matter. I grew up in a black ghetto, a city named Compton, due to this I have seen the effects of oppression on black individuals. I am a strong advocate for equitable right for all because humans should have the opportunity to succeed. I am privileged because I left the ghetto and now I able to write about it. I use this privilege to advocate for those who do not have this platform. However, one bias that I constantly navigate is the anti-blackness that exists in my Latino and Asian culture. This can be hard because it is ingrained at a young age, the fear darker skin. However, I try to push these biases aside especially when advocating for equal rights. I am hearing so my exposure to the Deaf community is very limited. My experience with the deaf community started a year ago when I started taking Deaf study courses. This area is new to me so I am still constantly learning what is appropriate to do and say.
The appropriate way to cite this paper would be chronological order. This paper is historically based and when writing about history, it is best to keep it organized chronologically. This is done in order to keep the events from becoming confused and intertwined. At times it seems like the stages of progression are very blurred and this helps clarify them. It also allows the reader to see the struggles that have occurr...


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... the minority group but can also spread to dominant group as well (397). The oppression did not only affect those at the bottom but also those at the top because once that position was taken they would not be able to survive if all people were at the same level. This one form of oppression lead to more oppression, on group that received this was the deaf community. He stated that by seeing blacks as second hand citizen it encouraged the same perspective to be placed on the Deaf community. Another topic that he is adamant about representing is the idea that all minority groups bring something good to the majority group (399). His most notable example is the effect that black civil right brought to the deaf and disabled community. For this reason, people should incorporate marginalized groups so that they can help each other and eventually help the entire groups benefit

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