The Black Codes Essays

The Black Codes Essays

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The Black Codes were very controversial in the North and in the South they were accepted and prominent. One reason why they were so controversial in the North was because they would try to persuade many African Americans to quit their jobs before their contracts would expire. In certain states where there were more African Americans than whites such as, Mississippi or South Carolina the Black Codes were harsher than in any other states. For example, in Mississippi a rule that if anyone without any type of job before January 1 of 1866 would be arrested if they could not pay a fee of 50 dollars. Many Congress members during Johnson’s time if office disliked his plan for Reconstruction in the South because it seemed like it was to “restore defeated and discredited Confederates to power in the South” (209).
The Congress was not happy about the Black Codes and the misconduct of recent events that Congress told Johnson that they would no longer any type of presidential restoration he had in mind. Congress then began to set up a Joint Committee of Fifteen, which was to figure out the conditions of states that were apart of Confederate states of America. One of the most prominent members of this group was a seventy four year old man by the name of Thaddeus Stevens he was also the head of the Republicans in the House. In Thaddeus Stevens perspective he thought Johnson was too lenient and was protecting the South, thus Stevens made “Negro suffrage in every rebel state” (210) his political platform. The Joint Committee was especially concentrated on the problems of race relations and the Freedmen’s Bureau.
The Joint Committee after their investigations were finished that many rebel states government’s where in ruins. If these states wer...


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...eadmitted into the Union on July 24, 1866. In Memphis on the day of April 30th a three- day riot came to be because the state accepted the Fourteenth Amendment. The riot was so bad that “twelve schools for African- Americans and four of their churches were burned” (211).
These examples show you the difference between Radial Reconstruction and Reconstruction policy of President Johnson. The United States during Gilded Age was changing and as African Americans began to receive more rights many white Americans did not like the idea of African Americans having equal rights like in Memphis for example. That is why many groups such as the Ku Klux Klan began to rise up to insure that African Americans would not have the same freedoms as white Americans in America. The Gilded Age in America changed race relations and had many outcomes for the future of the United States.

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The Black Codes Essays

- The Black Codes were very controversial in the North and in the South they were accepted and prominent. One reason why they were so controversial in the North was because they would try to persuade many African Americans to quit their jobs before their contracts would expire. In certain states where there were more African Americans than whites such as, Mississippi or South Carolina the Black Codes were harsher than in any other states. For example, in Mississippi a rule that if anyone without any type of job before January 1 of 1866 would be arrested if they could not pay a fee of 50 dollars....   [tags: Southern United States, American Civil War]

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