The Birth Control Of The United States Essay

The Birth Control Of The United States Essay

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Contraception Isn’t Healthcare; it isn’t even helpful
Americans supported birth control as a form of preventative healthcare. Birth control is universal. When Obama care was enacted, there was heated religious controversy over women’s access to birth control. We were already victims under the President’s healthcare law, with religion that Americans hold dearly, especially women, at the forefront of the birth control debate. Most of our female population, religious or not, used birth control in some point in their lives. According to the articles the current controversy is over the new rules with President Obama’s healthcare. It declares every women should have access to affordable health insurance, including birth control drugs regardless of religious practices. President Obama’s administration became downright indignant and sanctimonious about those poor women, who will suffer if the government doesn’t force religion or to provide free birth control for every women.
As religious leaders, we affirm the value of birth control as morally good for both individuals and society. As many religious traditions teach, the decision to become pregnant and have children is one of the most important commitments people make. These decisions affect our whole society and require responsible policies that involve us all, whether we experience the sacred joy of parenthood ourselves or we are partners in creating a culture of loving care.

The ability to decide when and under what circumstances to have children is critical to the health, happiness, and stability of women and families across the globe. We believe in expanding the availability of health care resources—especially to those individuals and communities whose options have been disp...


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...uthors that women who are employed whether or not a religious organization should be able to easy, affordable healthcare and not have out of the pocket expenses for birth control. Today according to Creamer’s that some of the religious organization required coverage for absolute nothing for birth control because it cutting down the number of unwanted pregnancies and some offer prescription insurance to cover birth control medication.
Birth control is universal and controversial, so what is the problem? Shocking it may seems that the women population uses birth control is one of society’s important moral priorites and should not be discourage, or it controversial, the use of birth control is critical to the survival and success of humanity. The moral thing to do is to make certain every woman who wants it has access to birth control whether of religion objections.

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The Birth Control Of The United States Essay

- Contraception Isn’t Healthcare; it isn’t even helpful Americans supported birth control as a form of preventative healthcare. Birth control is universal. When Obama care was enacted, there was heated religious controversy over women’s access to birth control. We were already victims under the President’s healthcare law, with religion that Americans hold dearly, especially women, at the forefront of the birth control debate. Most of our female population, religious or not, used birth control in some point in their lives....   [tags: Religion, Health care, Faith, Barack Obama]

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