Essay on The Bill Of Rights And The Constitution

Essay on The Bill Of Rights And The Constitution

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In 1789 the United states created the Bill of Rights to the Constitution after they gained independence from the British. Then in 1791 They added the amendments to the Constitution. There are many similarities to the Bill of Rights and the amendments in the Constitution but many people have a misconception that they are the same. There are some differences between the two and let’s see what are the difference in the two.
The Bill of Rights the first ten amendments to the US Constitution, ratified in 1791 and guaranteeing such rights as the freedoms of speech, assembly, and worship. These were the basic principles of the Bill of rights. These were the principles that American people was fighting for in the Revolutionary war. In the summer of 1787 thirteen delegates got together and came up with the Constitution. As things progressed they found out that the Constitution was deeply flawed and they needed to find a way to correct the problems that they had.
One of the main reasons that it was deeply flawed because it didn’t focus on what people had as an individual rights and liberties. What the Constitution focused on was what the government couldn’t do to the people but not what the people are allowed to do. As they noticed what was the weakness of the constitution the nation split in two about the people who supported the Bill of Right and the ones who didn’t. Those people who supported the Bill of Rights were called the Anti-Federalist and the ones who did not were called the Federalist. The Federalist believed in a strong central government to control the nation and send it in the right direction but the Anti-Federalist didn’t want a strong central government but the power governs in the states and with out the that ...


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...le have wont be fringed by the constitution, and the rights the states have so the national government doesn’t have to much control. These are the first Ten Amendments and what they allowed to happen. As I did more research on the later amendments that didn’t to much deal with rights to protect them from the government. The later amendments later gave rights to people and rules and regulations in everyday life.
When people talk about the amendments you can’t leave out the Bill of Rights. Then if you talk about bill of rights you can mention them without talking about any other of the amendments because of the simple fact because they were the first rights given to the people to protect them form the government. Then later down the road most of the amendments were more on the end to set guide lines about what’s going on around the government and not in one part.

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