The Between Plato And Hobbes Essay

The Between Plato And Hobbes Essay

Length: 1522 words (4.3 double-spaced pages)

Rating: Better Essays

Open Document

Essay Preview

“ They say that to do injustice is, by nature, good; to suffer the injustice, evil; but that the evil is greater than good”- Glaucon. Between Plato and Hobbes they have very different views on how justice and unjust can be served. Plato disagrees with what Glaucon has said about it but does say how it has reason. Hobbes refer to the justice as laws within the human nature and life. I will be showing the contrast between Plato and Hobbes views that are against or for Glaucon.
Plato is able to refute the claim that made by Glaucon because he views justice as a political body instead of Glaucon views on it. “And to those who, not being rich, are important with old age, it may be said with equal justice, that while on the one hand, a good man cannot be altogether cheerful with old age and poverty combined, so on the other, no wealth can ever make a bad man at peace with himself” (Cahn, 2005, p. 33). This quote helps show the difference on how they look at justice between the two. With Plato it seems he views justice as fit for everyone just not a particular person. Everything is made equal no matter what part of society they come from.
More with Plato he values the virtue of the should and how it helps with justice to man and to the city. “.. in his soul, there resides a better principle and a weaker, and when the naturally better principle and a weaker, and when the naturally better principle is master over the worse, this state of things is described by the term ‘ stronger than himself’ (Cahn, 2005, p. 74). Without man having soul what would they become, the soul holds a major factor. The soul holds a reason for justice and how we are able to judge how it can be. Another factor that helps with justice is courage and wisdom.
“.....


... middle of paper ...


...ght way so they can feel better about what they are doing for their society. While an unjust man just feels like they can get away with anything and have no remorse to what may happen to them because of the actions they are committing at the time, they have no feeling.
Showing how Plato and Hobbes viewed justice in difference to Glaucon. With Plato viewing it through a political mindset breaking down how virtue is important to being a just man and unjust man in life. While in Hobbes case he ties just with your surrounding of nature and law that also help make it more understanding for a just man or unjust man will have to deal with. Both philosophers have in common is that both believe in motivation for man and woman, and that you don 't have to rewarded for what you accomplish just keep going and you will be fine. As long as you keep up with the rules set for you.

Need Writing Help?

Get feedback on grammar, clarity, concision and logic instantly.

Check your paper »

The Between Plato And Hobbes Essay

- “ They say that to do injustice is, by nature, good; to suffer the injustice, evil; but that the evil is greater than good”- Glaucon. Between Plato and Hobbes they have very different views on how justice and unjust can be served. Plato disagrees with what Glaucon has said about it but does say how it has reason. Hobbes refer to the justice as laws within the human nature and life. I will be showing the contrast between Plato and Hobbes views that are against or for Glaucon. Plato is able to refute the claim that made by Glaucon because he views justice as a political body instead of Glaucon views on it....   [tags: Plato, Virtue, Justice, Philosophy]

Better Essays
1522 words (4.3 pages)

Plato Vs. Thomas Hobbes Essay

- Upon exposure under a modern viewpoint, with the benefit of hindsight to assist, the philosophies of Plato and Thomas Hobbes fall under an unequivocal category of judgment on how governments must run - specifically, that of complete authoritarianism. Throughout their lives, they pandered to delusions of assurance and refuge in absolute totalitarianism, with an insufficient amount of compelling evidence to bolster their assertions. Ordinarily, the enlightenment of enfranchisement in major countries like the United States should have abolished and denounced the ideologies indefinitely....   [tags: Thomas Hobbes, Political philosophy, Philosophy]

Better Essays
1133 words (3.2 pages)

Plato 's The Republic And Thomas Hobbes Essay

- Plato’s The Republic and Thomas Hobbes’ Leviathan are key texts within the conservative tradition. They each explore the human condition and its relationship to society at large. The two theorists recognize the need for a hierarchical form of government to maintain order; however, they differ in their account of the effect of desires, and emotions on political order and hierarchy. Plato asserts that desires lead to the ultimate corruption of society, whereas Hobbes believes that certain innate desires can contribute to peace....   [tags: Thomas Hobbes, Political philosophy, Leviathan]

Better Essays
1376 words (3.9 pages)

Justice in Plato's Republic and Hobbes' Leviathan Essay

- One of the main concepts in both Plato's Republic and Hobbes' Leviathan is justice. For Plato, the goal of his Republic is to discover what justice is and to demonstrate that it is better than injustice. Plato does this by explaining justice in two different ways: through a city or polis and through an individual human beings soul. He uses justice in a city to reveal justice in an individual. For Hobbes, the term justice is used to explain the relationship between morality and self-interest. Hobbes explains justice in relation to obligations and self-preservation....   [tags: Politics Philosophy Sociology]

Better Essays
2781 words (7.9 pages)

A Hobbesian and Heroic Unreflective Citizenship Essays

- A Hobbesian and Heroic Unreflective Citizenship In Meno, Plato asks “what virtue itself is” (Plato 60). This dialogue on virtue between Socrates and Meno ably frames a wider dialogue on ethics between Thomas Hobbes, the Greek heroic tradition, and the sophists of 5th century Athens. Hobbes’ Leviathan and Aristophanes’ The Clouds introduce three classes of ethical actors to respond to Plato’s inquiry: Hobbes’ ethical lemmings, the heroic ethical traditionalists, and the sophist ethical opportunists....   [tags: Hobbes Plato Philosophy Philosophical Essays]

Better Essays
1870 words (5.3 pages)

Comparison Of Plato And Augustine 's Views On Psychology Essays

- Anuradha Singh Ethics Fall 2014 Hobbes “Pleasure therefore, or delight, is the appearance, or sense of good; and molestation, or displeasure, and love, is accompanied with some delight more or less; and all hatred and aversion, with more or less displeasure and offense” -Hobbes Both Plato and Augustine were psychologically insightful, even brilliantly so. Aristotle certainly delved into the logic of deliberation and action as deeply as any philosopher before or since. But the idea of basing ethics wholly on psychology is a distinctively modern idea, and one of its first and foremost proponents was the English philosopher Thomas Hobbes....   [tags: Thomas Hobbes, Political philosophy]

Better Essays
930 words (2.7 pages)

Aristotle Between Aristotle And Hobbes Essay

- Aristotle and Hobbes have different views on what is good, which results in contrasting moral theories. These philosophers both have different views on what is good, how to act, and how to be. The way in which Aristotle defines happiness, is opposed in the views and beliefs of Hobbes. Aristotle believed that there was a final good and opposing him was the belief that Hobbes had which was that there was no final good. They both believed that being moral wasn’t only good for you but also good for others....   [tags: Ethics, Virtue, Plato, Nicomachean Ethics]

Better Essays
1190 words (3.4 pages)

Essay about Plato, Machiavelli, And Lao Tzu

- “Goodness” in government Plato, Machiavelli, and Lao-tzu each have varying points of views on government. Plato’s political views have more similarities to that of Lao-tzu rather than Machiavelli. In general, most people believe that in order to have a strong country you must have a good government that cares equally for all of its citizens. According to Plato, leaders are those who ascend to a higher level of good and are then able to empathize with the people. Similarly Lao-tzu states “If you want to govern the people, you must place yourself below them....   [tags: Political philosophy, Thomas Hobbes, Government]

Better Essays
1641 words (4.7 pages)

Essay on Thomas Hobbes : The New Era Of Philosophy

- Thomas Hobbes was born during the Spanish Armada on April 5th, 1588 in Westport, England. Abandoned by his father at an young age, Hobbes went and lived with his rich Uncle. The Uncle provided him with an education and sent him to Magdalen Hall at the age of 14. In 1608 he left college and became a tutor to the earl of Devonshire’s son. While he was a tutor, he was exposed to foreign lands and libraries with vast amounts of knowledge. While he was abroad, he studied the works of modern philosophers: Copernicus, Bacon, Gassendi and Galileo....   [tags: Thomas Hobbes, Political philosophy, Sovereignty]

Better Essays
1672 words (4.8 pages)

Thomas Hobbes' Leviathan Essay

- Hobbes; Leviathan Hobbes wrote the Leviathan and divided it into four different sections. For sake of brevity, I will only discuss the second book in, which Hobbes discusses the Commonwealth. He, like Rousseau, holds up the idea that the people of a society are better off by joining the social contract, which all humans are unintentionally apart of. In Book II, Hobbes asserts that there must be some form of leadership, which holds the people together and keeps them from following their natural instincts to gain power and use it in a malicious way....   [tags: Leviathan Essays]

Free Essays
629 words (1.8 pages)