The Between Hamlet And The Seagull Essay

The Between Hamlet And The Seagull Essay

Length: 1497 words (4.3 double-spaced pages)

Rating: Strong Essays

Open Document

Essay Preview

It is said that should literature be purged of all works, save for Shakespeare’s Hamlet, that the realm of drama would be saved. While all the world’s theatres would remain merely functional, the 19th century Russian stage, in this case, would thrive. Anton Chekhov, a revered Russian playwright of the famous Moscow Art Theatre, would be the rightful king of Russian drama because Chekhov’s flagship masterpiece, The Seagull, embodies a direct subtextual correlation to Shakespeare’s Hamlet. Chekhov’s characters: Treplev, Arkadina, and Trigorin epitomize the Danish Prince Hamlet, Queen Gertrude, and King Claudius both in speech and psyche. This equation is only satisfied with the likeness of thought between the two puppet masters. After all, like Shakespeare, Chekhov was a writer of convenience, born in the right place at the right time. Undoubtedly, similar philosophies render homologous symbols, motifs, and themes. The correlation between Hamlet and The Seagull lacks none of the prior devices. Both playwrights masterfully portray their respective takes on existentialist thought while also demonstrating visionary ideals for the stage. Although Hamlet and The Seagull sprouted apart through distance and time, the chain that ties the two together is strong.
Interestingly enough, both plays begin with a similar symbol: dark clothing. Furthermore, both instances seem to reflect an emotion of hopelessness and despair. In Act 1, Scene 2 of Hamlet, we catch this reference through the words of Queen Gertrude during a conversation she has with Claudius and Hamlet. Hamlet voices his disapproval of his mother’s traitorous act of defiling the legacy of King Hamlet by marrying so soon after his death. Claudius and Hamlet have a brief battle of th...


... middle of paper ...


...closeness to Nina. This fear triggers a reactionary spite against Trigorin, which is shown in The Seagull as a challenge to duel. However, in Hamlet, Claudius employs his closeness to Ophelia in order to expose Hamlet’s “antic disposition” which subsequently drives Hamlet to cautiousness even around Ophelia. In both cases, we see that the relationship between two lovers is poisoned by the presence of interlopers who seek to attract the females despite their standing relationships.
Without doubt, Chekhov’s masterpiece, The Seagull, ushers in a new take on the Shakespearean tragedy, but on the modern stage. This practice is commonplace for playwrights. The subtextual relationship between a modern work and its antique predecessor is a connection to be admired and understood, for without this crucial idea, holistic comprehension of the modern work is simply impossible.

Need Writing Help?

Get feedback on grammar, clarity, concision and logic instantly.

Check your paper »

Essay on Multi Dimensionality in the Seagull by Anton Chekhov

- Anton Chekhov includes many dimensions to the plot of the Seagull in order to add increased depth to the story. The conflict, climax, complications, and denouement of the play all benefit from the wide range problems that Chekhov implants through the characters. In addition, the complex character relationships add to these events, without confusing the reader. These four events all rotate around the play's four main characters, Nina, Irina, Treplev and Trigorin. The play's central conflict is between Treplev and Trigorin, who holds the love of both Irina and Nina....   [tags: Seagull Essays]

Strong Essays
995 words (2.8 pages)

Essay on The Myth Of The Cave By Jonathan Livingston Seagull

- An allegory is a story that has hidden meaning buried in it, usually a moral, political, or religious meaning. The book Jonathan Livingston Seagull by Richard Bach, and the short story “The Myth of the Cave” by Plato, are both considered to be allegories. In fact, they are very similar allegories because their hidden meanings are alike. In “The Myth of the Cave,” the people are sitting in a deep, dark cave with nothing to live for. Similarly, in “Jonathan Livingston Seagull,” the flock is wrapped up in the idea that all they have to do in life is find food and eat it....   [tags: Jonathan Livingston Seagull, Richard Bach]

Strong Essays
714 words (2 pages)

Jonathan Livingston Seagull And The Myth Of The Cave Essay

- Jonathan the Freed Prisoner Both Jonathan Livingston Seagull (a novel by Richard Bach) and “The Myth of the Cave” (a short story written by the commonly-studied philosopher, Plato) are commonly referred to as allegories. An allegory is a work of art that possesses a hidden moral or political message beneath its actual appearance. In many ways, one could easily interpret both of these superb writings to hold the same meaning. One presentation that holds true to this is that Richard Bach’s character, Jonathan, compares to the prisoner that escapes in Plato’s work, “The Myth of the Cave.” Metaphorically, both of these characters are held as prisoners in their life, but then later are freed and...   [tags: Jonathan Livingston Seagull, Richard Bach]

Strong Essays
1279 words (3.7 pages)

`` Warriors Don 't Cry `` And Jonathan Livingston Seagull Essay

- The world is a vast place, separated by broken up landmass, but united by beliefs, languages, and similar interests. The world is made up of societies, but what exactly is one. The definition of the word society is, “the aggregate of people living together in a more or less ordered community”. In simpler terms, a society is made up of people, collectively and individually that decide what to make of it. So what does it take to make it a good one or a bad one. The answer is simple, but it’s also very hard to understand: the answer is the choices people make....   [tags: Jonathan Livingston Seagull, Richard Bach]

Strong Essays
1087 words (3.1 pages)

John Livingstone Seagull By Richard Bach And The Myth Of The Cave Essay

- A young seagull who loves to fly is banished from his flock, but after mastering flight, returns to share these new discoveries with his old flock. A man kept imprisoned in a dark cave is introduced to the outside world, and later returns to the cave to tell his fellow prisoners about it. On the surface, both Jonathan Livingstone Seagull by Richard Bach and “The Myth of the Cave” by Plato have almost childishly simple plots. In both, a character leaves his home, learns something, and returns. However, these stories gain a deeper significance when the reader views them as allegories....   [tags: Jonathan Livingston Seagull, Richard Bach]

Strong Essays
1094 words (3.1 pages)

An Analysis Of Jonathan Lingston Seagull And The Free Prisoner Essay example

- Allegory a word by definition means, contains a moral, political, or religious meaning. Both stories, (Jonathan Lingston Seagull, and Plato, “Myth of The Cave.” The Republic. Vol. VII, contain a religious meaning. Jonathan Lingston Seagull and the free prisoner are similar in many ways because both characters experience a religious awakening, return, and rejection. In both stories the characters Jonathan and the free prisoner both experience a religious awakening. Jonathan’s episode with religion is being what we as Christian’s call a disciple, meaning to spread the word of God, however; that is not exactly what Jonathan is....   [tags: Jonathan Livingston Seagull, Richard Bach, Prison]

Strong Essays
783 words (2.2 pages)

Jonathan Livingston Seagull Essay

- Jonathan Livingston Seagull Jonathan was not an ordinary seagull. For a thousand years, seagulls have spent their whole life on scrambling after fish heads. But Jonathan saw something different. He thought that life should not be just eating and fighting, even seagulls should have a reason to live. For him, his meaning of life is to fly. We all wish that we could spend all our time on doing things we like, just as Jonathan spent all his time on his beloved flight. However, the success in finding his meaning of life didn't bring with him any honor, but caused him to be an object of shame and irresponsibility, and to be banished due to his neglect to finding food....   [tags: Jonathan Livingston Seagull Essays]

Free Essays
1119 words (3.2 pages)

Essay on Hamlet, By Kenneth Branagh And Hamlet

- William Shakespeare was a very famous English poet, playwright, and actor. One of the famous plays that he wrote was “Hamlet”. Hamlet is a very famous play and many play writers or directors interpret Shakespeare’s play differently. A Great scene to compares is Act5 scene 2. The two films that will be compared are “Hamlet” from 1996 directed by Kenneth Branagh and “Hamlet” from 2009 directed by Gregory Doran. The two different directors took the same play and made it reflect their own interpretation....   [tags: Hamlet, Characters in Hamlet, Hamlet, Gertrude]

Strong Essays
1210 words (3.5 pages)

The Foils of Hamlet Essay

- The Foils of Hamlet Hamlet is dominated by an emotion which is inexpressible, because it is in excess of the facts as they appear.... We should have to understand things which Shakespeare did not understand himself." T.S. Eliot (Hamlet and His Problems) In the play Hamlet [Titles] by William Shakespeare the cast of main characters use the support given to them by the foils to enhance the play. A foil is a minor character who by simulations [?] and differences reveals character, and who, as an element of plot, is there for the more important character to talk to (vevra [sic] )....   [tags: Hamlet]

Free Essays
881 words (2.5 pages)

Hamlet's Frustration Essay

- Hamlet's Frustration In order to understand Hamlet, we must understand his frustration. This frustration is most clear in his famous monologue, famously beginning with the line "Oh what a rogue and peasant slave am I." This self-condemnation is contrasted by his admiration for the actor of the previous scene, who "in a fiction" is able to "force his soul to his own conceit." The word "soul" is an example of metonymy, as the soul represents the actor's "visage," "tears," "distraction," and "voice." Thus Hamlet equates "soul" with one's actions, so by his own comparison his soul is weak, as he does not take action against the king....   [tags: Hamlet]

Strong Essays
1080 words (3.1 pages)