Behavioral And Emotional Changes Of Alzheimer 's Disease Essay

Behavioral And Emotional Changes Of Alzheimer 's Disease Essay

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Imagine what it would be like to have someone close to you, like your mother, slowly begin to forget things. It may begin with something small, like forgetting to cancel a plan with you or complaining that she’s misplaced her keys. Although, after a while you begin to notice some unusual cognitive, behavioral and emotional changes in her. You decide that perhaps it is for the best if you take her to see a doctor. You go the doctor’s office and she receives a diagnoses that she has Alzheimer’s disease. You want to help her in any way that you can, and for a time you do, but as time passes and the sickness advances, taking care of her will prove to become increasingly difficult. Eventually, she may even forget who you are, she may be so far gone that she may need to be institutionalized. This is something that happens to most people who have relatives that have been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s. Unfortunately, there is currently no cure in existence. For now, the only thing doctors can do is prescribe medication to lessen the amount and gravity of symptoms. Regrettably, that’s as far as it goes, masking the symptoms, but not taking care of the problem. “The life expectancy for patients with Alzheimer’s after onset of symptoms averages eight to ten years” (Brangman).
Alzheimer’s disease during the mild stages is characterized by mild confusion or forgetfulness but as it progresses over time it begins to affect your ability to recall memories, especially recent ones (Brangman). As Alzheimer’s continues to develop your livelihood is more and more compromised. You may find that you get lost in familiar places, you forget appointments, events or conversations you had with someone and not remember them at all later. You may find that you’r...


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...ek programme designed to teach the participants new memory strategies, there was activation in several additional brain regions during memory tests, suggesting that intact areas of the brain were able to take over from damaged areas. The participants also scored better on the tests. Many studies of cognitive stimulation and dementia make use of computer games designed to boost mental skills. Although such ‘brain training’ interventions do not generally make healthy people smarter, they produce positive results in people with Alzheimer’s disease and related conditions. One 2006 trial funded by the US National Institutes of Health showed that brain training can counteract some of the cognitive decline expected with ageing. In that study — known as Advanced Cognitive Training for Independent and Vital Elderly (ACTIVE) — people over 65 years of age who did a five- to six-

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