The Atomic Bomb Of The United States Essays

The Atomic Bomb Of The United States Essays

Length: 890 words (2.5 double-spaced pages)

Rating: Strong Essays

Open Document

Essay Preview

On July 16, 1945, upon witnessing the detonation of the first atomic bomb, physicist and scientific director of the Manhattan Project Robert Oppenheimer uttered these words: “Now I am become Death, the destroyer of worlds (“The Nuclear Age”). Only over time would the American public come to comprehend what Oppenheimer understood the minute he saw the mushroom cloud rising up and spreading across the sky: the deadly and destructive potential behind the atomic bomb surpassed any weapon the world had ever seen.
Histories of nuclear weaponry in the United States focus largely on the political debates surrounding the government’s decision to bomb Japan and its successive use of the weapon of mass destruction as a tool of Cold War foreign policy, while other documents explore the scientific background and subsequent moral dilemmas faced by the thousands of engineers and scientists who worked to bring the nuclear bomb to life. These texts rarely elaborate on the extent to which the bomb impacted domestic American culture and the lives of everyday American people. Similarly, the 1960s and its accompanying counterculture ideology are oft-discussed topics – countless articles, books, and media have been published detailing the rise of the rebellious generation of youth who scorned the traditional ways of their parents and grandparents. Yet much of the analyses on the 1960s credit the Vietnam War as the primary impetus for the emergence of the counterculture movement and make no mention of the undercurrent of restlessness present during the two decades prior. While most texts draw a sharp distinction between the atomic age of the 1940s and 1950s and the counterculture movement of the 1960s, these two periods in history are in fact fundamenta...


... middle of paper ...


...nent global superpower with an affluent economy, poised to shape, if not define, the postwar international order. As the victors, Americans felt that they had carried out their democratic duty and ostensibly “[freed] an older civilization from its own tyranny” (2). Furthermore, America had not simply won the war – it had triumphed over its enemies using one of the greatest American technological feats of the twentieth century: the atomic bomb. Henriksen contends that this age of scientific progress and economic prosperity contributed to a “culture of consensus” (xx). As America’s “power and promise reached dizzying heights” in the period following World War II, Americans, who had previously advocated for the policy of isolationism and spurned political entanglements, eagerly accepted the atomic bomb and its accompanying cold war responsibilities with little criticism

Need Writing Help?

Get feedback on grammar, clarity, concision and logic instantly.

Check your paper »

The Atomic Bomb Of The United States Essay

- In the early 1940’s America developed the atomic bomb. Soon after, in the late 1940’s the Soviet Union developed their own atomic bomb. This discovery, struck fear into the government and the citizens of the United States. The government knew that they had to prepare safety measures in the event that an atomic bomb were to hit us. They portrayed the dangers and effects of the atomic bomb as minor threats which lead many Americans to not fully understand the real dangers. The government told America that there were only three worries if an atomic bomb were to hit the United States, heat, blast, and radiation....   [tags: Nuclear weapon, Nuclear fallout]

Strong Essays
1314 words (3.8 pages)

The Atomic Bomb Of The United States Essays

- On July 16, 1945, upon witnessing the detonation of the first atomic bomb, physicist and scientific director of the Manhattan Project Robert Oppenheimer uttered these words: “Now I am become Death, the destroyer of worlds (“The Nuclear Age”). Only over time would the American public come to comprehend what Oppenheimer understood the minute he saw the mushroom cloud rising up and spreading across the sky: the deadly and destructive potential behind the atomic bomb surpassed any weapon the world had ever seen....   [tags: World War II, Nuclear weapon]

Strong Essays
890 words (2.5 pages)

The United States Dropping The Atomic Bomb Essay

- Introduction Throughout time, human beings have gathered, connected and utilized objects for themselves in one way or another to better their lives. These objects are usually collected over a long period of time and stored in museums to remind the community of historical or artistic significance. In the United States, every museum has artifacts that naturally lend themselves to social experiences in the community. It might be a slave whip that triggers museum visitors to share their memories of their grandparent’s experience during the African American slave trade, or a dinosaur’s skeleton that makes people speculate on how the current world would have been with them in it....   [tags: Nuclear weapon]

Strong Essays
1155 words (3.3 pages)

Essay about Why Did The United States Drop The Atomic Bomb?

- #5 –– Why did the United States drop the atomic bomb. Reading through chapter 23 of the textbook, I was left with one primary belief for why the U.S. chose to drop the atomic bomb. Although there were many factors involved in this decision, the textbook suggests that the single greatest reason for its use was because of its potential to be used as a demonstration of pure force. Additionally there are many characteristics involved in the dropping of the bomb that seem to back up this assertion....   [tags: Nuclear weapon, Cold War, World War II]

Strong Essays
1091 words (3.1 pages)

Hiroshima-Nagasaki: Entering Into the Atomic Age Essay

- On August 6, 1945, in an attempt to bring an end to World War II, the United States dropped the world’s first atomic bomb on Hiroshima, a Japanese city and military center. Most of the population stood helpless in the open as the sighting of only three aircraft quickly caused a roaring of air raid warnings. The extraordinary event destroyed nearly two-thirds of the city and immediately killed tens of thousands of people, and tens of thousands more died later from radiation exposure. Sixteen hours after the attack, United States President, Harry S....   [tags: Japan, atomic bomb, United States, nuclear weapon]

Strong Essays
2168 words (6.2 pages)

Essay on Why the United States dropped the Atomic Bomb

- Why the United States dropped the Atomic Bomb The atomic bomb is the subject of much controversy. Since its first detonation in 1945, the entire world has heard the aftershocks of that blast. Issues concerning Nuclear Weapons sparked the Cold War. We also have the atomic bomb to thank for our relative peace in this time due to the fear of Mutually Assured Destruction (MAD). The effects of the atomic bomb might not have been the exact effects that the United States was looking for when they dropped Little Boy and Fat Man on Hiroshima and Nagasaki respectively (Grant, 1998)....   [tags: American America History]

Free Essays
1239 words (3.5 pages)

Was Bombing Hiroshima and Nagasaki Necessary to End World War 2? Essay

- Plan of Investigation During the time period when Franklin D. Roosevelt was in office, it was during WWII. Japan attacked the U.S. on Dec. 7, 1941 and was known as Pearl Harbor. When that happened, Roosevelt did not hesitate to ask Congress to officially declare war on Japan. During the war, there was a proposal of an atomic bomb landing over Hiroshima and Nagasaki to finalize the war. To this day there is still controversy that if that atomic bomb was actually necessary to end the war, because of the number of innocent casualties suffered from the Japanese....   [tags: Japan, United States, Pearl Harbor, atomic bomb]

Strong Essays
1641 words (4.7 pages)

The Atomic Bomb On Japan Essay

- How different would the world be if America had never dropped the bomb on Japan to end World War II. If America had simply offered Japan a way to surrender by simply threatening the use of the atomic bomb, would Japan have surrendered. The world will never know, however Leo Szilard, one of the scientists that created the atomic bomb, tried to make a plea for this to happen. A month before the atomic bomb was dropped on Japan in WWII, Leo Szilard and 59 scientists stood up for what they believed in and tried to alter the thinking and decision that the President was making....   [tags: World War II, Nuclear weapon, United States]

Strong Essays
834 words (2.4 pages)

Essay about The Benefits of Dropping an Atomic Bomb on Japan

- Angelina Jolie said, “Without pain, there would be no suffering, without suffering we would never learn from our mistakes. To make it right, pain and suffering is the key to windows, without it, there is no way of life.” On August 6, 1945 the atomic bomb was dropped on Hiroshima, a small city whose death toll rises to 90,000-166,000. On August 9th, a second bomb was dropped on Nagasaki, 60,000–80,000 . In total, 15 million people lost their lives during the duration of the Second World War. In John Hersey's book, Hiroshima, he provides a detailed account of six people and how the bombing of Hiroshima affected their lives....   [tags: atomic bomb, hiroshima]

Strong Essays
1278 words (3.7 pages)

The Atomic Bomb Essay

- In 1969 four computers, located in universities across the United States were connected together creating the first network ARPANET. The project funded by the U.S. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency or D.A.R.P.A would become the first iteration of what we now call the Internet. Little did they know this that four computer network would become one of the most important inventions since the atomic bomb. Its facilitation of communication at any distance, and the ability to have information at hand instantly is a powerful tool and can be a force for good, or at times dangerous weapon enabling devious behavior....   [tags: Internet, History of the Internet, United States]

Strong Essays
1806 words (5.2 pages)