Aristotle 's Moral And Intellectual Virtues Essay

Aristotle 's Moral And Intellectual Virtues Essay

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We are, but pieces of clay waiting to be molded by the artist into an intricate piece of artwork. Aristotle clearly understood this concept as he discussed how our virtues are shaped by those around us in the Nicomachean Ethics. He talks about two main types of virtues, moral and intellectual one of which we are born with, but we must learn through teaching whereas the other comes about through receptiveness. Aristotle goes into lengthy detail about how virtues play a key role throughout our lives; he converses about the differences between the two and how we cannot change the course of our virtues. Moral and intellectual virtues are both birthed and learnt through various courses of actions during our lives.
Moral virtue as defined by Aristotle arises through habit, meaning that moral values do not come naturally to us. Through repetition our moral values develop into habitual behavior. Aristotle says we cannot reverse the directionality of a fire because it has habitually always moved upward so therefore it cannot naturally move any other way. We cannot train habitual things to do the exact opposite of what they have always done even if we try repeatedly it will never be successful because we have adapted to the norms of how things work within the world. The following quote discusses Aristotle’s perspective on moral views.
“For instance the stone which by nature moves downwards cannot be habituated to move upwards, not even if one tries to train it by throwing it up ten thousand times; nor can fire be habituated to move downwards, nor can anything else that by nature behaves in one way be trained to behave in another.” (pg.1)
Intellectual virtues are learnt via experiences and in due time, we are not just born knowing how to do ...


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...but I still put myself out there and do things that petrify me because even if I fail I have learned a lesson for next time. We often do not do things because of the possibility of setbacks and miss out on the opportunity of a lifetime.
Aristotle teaches us that moral and intellectual virtues are an important part of our lives; we are continuously taught new segments of wisdom and making mistakes that teach us that setbacks are a natural occurring event. We are not born knowing how to do tasks we are taught by others and by our mishaps. Aristotle understood that we are mere humans that will always make mistakes, but we must learn from those obstacles in our lives. Intellectual and moral values are concepts that are instilled in us by others and we mold into our own ideal belief system. We are, but a piece of unfinished art that is never truly completed only added to.

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