Essay about Aristotle And John Stuart Mill

Essay about Aristotle And John Stuart Mill

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What is true happiness? What are its causes and conditions? Is it merely a state of feeling overjoyed or pleasured? What relationship exists between happiness and a meaningful life? Such questions have been debated time and time again throughout history. Philosophers of many different backgrounds and beliefs have studied immensely in an attempt to find the answers. Aristotle and John Stuart Mill are two great philosophers who each came up with different definitions of happiness and how one obtains it. While both of these philosophers had similar ideas about the definitions of happiness, they each had different theories on what constitutes happiness and what it means to be truly happy.
Aristotle is known as one of the founding fathers of Western philosophy. He was a Greek philosopher who studied a wide range of subjects, including ethics. In one of his greatest works, Nicomachean Ethics, Aristotle deeply explores and reflects on the meaning of life, including how one can reach true happiness. Aristotle begins book one of Nicomachean Ethics by questioning the ultimate purpose of human existence. He argues that everything we do is “for the sake of the end” (Aristotle). That end, according to Aristotle is happiness. To understand this, one might ask himself a question as simple as “Why do we get tired?” The answers to this question can give an insight as to how we become happy as humans. Now, to answer this question, it is necessary to know the end result. This poses a new question: “What is the end result of being tired?” The answer to that question is simple, for it is sleep. However, it does not end there. Sleep also has an end result, and that is to grant the body rest. Granting the body rest is a means of being healthy. Having a...


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...one of the most important aspects life. So, what is happiness? Is it a moment of excitement? Is it accomplishing a goal, or finally achieving something we thought was impossible? Is it a short term feeling of pleasure or the ending of a life of virtue and excellence? Yes, happiness can be all of those things, and so much more. It isn’t just a moment, a feeling of pleasure or instant gratification. It is a lifetime goal that we all strive for. It is very complex, and it is not the same for everyone. Therefore, can it really be defined? Is there a sole way to pursuit it? The answer is no. While we have examined many ways one can be happy through the works of two great philosophers, a person’s happiness is specific to that individual. We all have a different definition or idea of what makes us happy, and because of that, we all have different means of getting there.



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