Essay about Are We Doing Enough For The Caribbean?

Essay about Are We Doing Enough For The Caribbean?

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The Organisation of Eastern Caribbean States (OECS) sprang forth with some of its many purposes of subsistence being: to facilitate the fostering of beneficial associations among member states and in doing so, assist in achieving economic growth and development, as well as promoting economic and political integration among member states thereby vastly extending the region’s sphere of influence. Nevertheless, a circumspect examination of the OECS member states inadvertently reveals that in spite of our rich combined cultural heritage and abundant natural resources, we as a collective group are not doing enough to promote sustainable use of our local products and natural resources and thus, we are hindering the promotion of self-sufficiency within the region particularly within OECS member states.

The advent of the industrial age brought with it not only a gargantuan and rapid advancement of technology, but also a vast wealth of knowledge and information to those willing to utilize it advantageously. The academic potential of Caribbean people has been demonstrated time and again. Whether it is from our Nobel Laureates, or numerous graduates from our extremely esteemed educational institutions, such as the University of the West Indies, one cannot deny our collective intelligence. However, it is insidious to assume that Caribbean people only excel in academics. For it has now become global knowledge of our numerous sports related achievements from our now renown West Indies Cricket Team or more colloquially known as the Windies to St. Lucia’s very own Levern Spencer, one can unmistakably see that we as Caribbean people are multi-faceted, in that we are capable of accomplishing tremendous feats. Why then do Caribbean states choose ...


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...uries before that while many believed us to be far too inferior in capacities to undertake revolutionary feats; we however have proved them wrong. Time and again the Caribbean has proven its worth in all facets of life and is now a force to be reckoned with in the global arena. We can still compete with our world superpower counterparts but only by fully utilising all our resources. Given the scope and sheer tenacity of the efforts of the Caribbean people, combined with our ethos, all indications point towards a brighter future for our beloved region.



Works Cited

http://www.onecaribbean.org/content/files/RileyRemarksACTS%20Brussels.pdf
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2010/07/27/st-lucia-geothermal-energ_n_660401.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Economy_of_the_Caribbean
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Organisation_of_Eastern_Caribbean_States
http://www.oecs.org/

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Essay on Are We Doing enough For The Caribbean?

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