Andrew Jackson 's Actions And Responses Towards The Native American Nation

Andrew Jackson 's Actions And Responses Towards The Native American Nation

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When someone mentions the name "Andrew Jackson", what comes to mind? Is it the infamous Bank War where he attempted to destroy the Second Bank of the United States? Or, is it the term "Jacksonian Democracy" and the creation of the short-lived Whig Party? If you are a Native American, that name may be a painful reminder of the Indian Removal Act and the Trail of Tears. To the Native American populous, the seventh president of the United States is a figure who brought pain and suffering to their ancestors. He was not the "common man" often portrayed in history books who worked on behalf of all who lived in the United States. This former war hero focused on pleasing American farmers and settlers, not the needs of Native tribes. Andrew Jackson 's villainous actions and responses towards the Native Americans people during his presidency affected the approach the United States treated the Native Americans throughout the 19th Century.
After he was elected president in 1828, Andrew Jackson entered into office with a rigid agenda. Alongside opposing the National Bank and stopping the abuse of the federal government, Jackson also desired to relocate Native Americans to beyond the Mississippi River. From an early age, Jackson developed a sense of hatred towards the Native tribes of America. This mindset increased during his years as a farmer and a soldier. As a soldier, Jackson fought on the colonial side for the duration of the American Revolution. On the opposing side, the British army forged an alliance with Native American tribes. By creating this bond, Native Americans would be able to keep lands given to them in Britain 's Royal Proclamation of 1763. In the eyes of Jackson, little was done to "punish" the tribes who ...


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...bes. According to Section 8 of the Dawes Act, "…the provisions of this act shall not extend to the territory occupies by the Cherokees, Creeks, Choctaws, Chickasaws, Seminoles, and Osage, Miamies and Peorias, and Sacs and Foxes, in the Indian Territory." ( ) These tribes occupied a large amount of fertile land, perfect for American farms. In order to correct the "mistake", Congress passed an amendment in 1898 named the Curtis Act. This abolished Section 8 of the Dawes Act, and forced the tribes who were originally omitted to follow all rules and regulations of the Dawes Act. Now, the federal government of the United States could legally seize Native lands without consent of the tribe. Areas such as Oklahoma became open for purchase for American citizens to inhabit. Removal of Native Americans became legal, just as Andrew Jackson had originally desired.

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