Essay on Andrew Jackson and The Indian Removal Act

Essay on Andrew Jackson and The Indian Removal Act

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Picture being kicked out of your home that you grew up in and wanted to raise your children in, how would you feel? Imagine the fury and the sadness that would be running through your veins. This is how the Native Americans felt in 1830 when Andrew Jackson came up with the Indian Removal Act. The Indian Removal Act and the events leading up to it is a direct violation of the constitution. It is unconstitutional because the Natives had to convert their way of life to “stay” on their own land and then forced them off their tribal land. Jackson was a power hungry man who believed that anything he said everyone had to abide by, especially the Indian Removal Act.
Andrew Jackson was born on March 15, 1767 in between the two Carolinas in a small cabin. His father died before he was born and his mother and both brothers all died when he turned 14 years old, he was an orphan (The Seventh US President - Andrew Jackson). He was born poor and worked his way up from the bottom to get through law school with the help of three hundred dollars inherited to him by his grandfather. When Jackson was twenty-four years old he moved to Tennessee, where he would meet his wife that he loved and adored, Rachel Robards, to practice law. He married her in 1791 and helped her raise her eleven children like his own.
Jackson has been involved in the national government since 1796 where he was the delegate for Tennessee as a member of the House of Representatives. From 1797 to 1825 Jackson was a busy man, in that time span he was the United States Senator at two different times, a member of the Supreme Court, fought in the war of 1812, and ran for president but lost against John Q. Adams (The Seventh US President - Andrew Jackson). When Jackson lost to Adams...


... middle of paper ...


...y far an unconstitutional president that only did what he wanted and disregarded any input that was thrown his way.



Works Cited
Cave, Alfred A. "Abuse Of Power: Andrew Jackson And The Indian Removal Act Of 1830." Historian 65.6 (2003): 1330-1353. Academic Search Premier. Web. 2 Apr. 2014.
"Indian Removal Act." PBS. PBS, n.d. Web. 1 Apr. 2014. "Indian Removal and the Trail of Tears." About.com 19th Century History. N.p., n.d. Web. 1 Apr. 2014. .
Stewart, Mark. The Indian Removal Act: forced relocation. Minneapolis: Compass Point Books, 2007. Print.
"The Seventh US President - Andrew Jackson." The Seventh US President - Andrew Jackson. N.p., n.d. Web. 1 Apr. 2014.

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