Essay on Andersonville Prison

Essay on Andersonville Prison

Length: 951 words (2.7 double-spaced pages)

Rating: Better Essays

Open Document

Essay Preview

Andersonville, officially named Camp Sumter, was the most infamous Confederate prison during the Civil War (Davis 350; Reeder 140). The camp first opened in February 1864 close to the village of Andersonville in Sumter County, Georgia. Due to a food shortage at the compound in Richmond, Virginia, caused by an overflow of war prisoners, the Confederate officials decided to build a new prison in southwest Georgia (Turner 161, 162). The first prisoners arrived to an open expansion of sixteen acres, later increased to twenty-six acres, surrounded by a fifteen-foot tall fence (Davis 351). The conditions of this prison were truly horrendous because the prisoners were not provided with any form of soap, clothing, or shelter (Reeder 141). Andersonville was notorious for their ill treatment, lack of nutrition and protection, and harsh security along with their cruel wardens (Turner 161).
The Andersonville Prison was occupied by innumerable soldiers, much more than the camp was designed for, and because of that many men had inadequate shelter. The prison was built to only house ten thousand people, but ended up holding more than three times that amount (Turner 162). Nonetheless, four hundred new prisoners arrived daily, and by the time summer ended, the camp contained thirty-three thousand citizens, which made Andersonville the fifth largest city in the Confederacy (Davis 351; Savage 43). Forty-nine thousand and five hundred Union troops had passed through the camp’s gates by the time the war ended (Hyde 131). At any
Smith 2
given time, anybody could find around fifteen thousand men without any kind of shelter (Davis 352). Since the Confederate government did not prepare living quarters for the prisoners, the captives had to learn to make...


... middle of paper ...


...etheless, over a hundred men died per day due to lack of nourishment, healthcare, and even suicide by purposefully crossing the deadline causing the mortality rate to be twenty-nine percent (Davis 352; Savage 45; Turner 162).



Works Cited

Davis, Kenneth C. Don’t Know Much about the Civil War. New York: HarperCollins, 1996.
Print.
Futch, Ovid. “Prison Life at Andersonville.” Civil War Prisons. Ed. William B. Hesseltine. Kent:
Kent State UP, 1962. Print.
Hyde, Solon. “Andersonville.” The Civil War. Evanston: Nextext, 2000. Print.
Reeder, Red. The Story of the Civil War. New York: Meredith, 1968. Print.
Rees, Bob. The Civil War. Chicago: Heinemann, 2012. FolletShelf. Web. 18 Nov. 2013.
Savage, Douglas J. Prison Camps in the Civil War. Philadelphia: Chelsea, 2000. Print.
Turner, Thomas R. 101 Things You Didn’t Know about the Civil War. Avon: Adams, 2007.
Print.

Need Writing Help?

Get feedback on grammar, clarity, concision and logic instantly.

Check your paper »

Essay on Andersonville Prison

- Andersonville, officially named Camp Sumter, was the most infamous Confederate prison during the Civil War (Davis 350; Reeder 140). The camp first opened in February 1864 close to the village of Andersonville in Sumter County, Georgia. Due to a food shortage at the compound in Richmond, Virginia, caused by an overflow of war prisoners, the Confederate officials decided to build a new prison in southwest Georgia (Turner 161, 162). The first prisoners arrived to an open expansion of sixteen acres, later increased to twenty-six acres, surrounded by a fifteen-foot tall fence (Davis 351)....   [tags: Camp Sumter, Confederate Prison, Civil War]

Better Essays
951 words (2.7 pages)

Andersonville Prison Essay

- Andersonville Prison I was excited to learn of this assignment because I recently made a trip to Andersonville with my Army unit in March. During the bus ride, we watched the film “Andersonville” to gain a deeper sense of what the historical site was about before we arrived. To be quite honest, the historical site itself is actually quite boring and not much is left of the original grounds....   [tags: Film Movie History Civil War]

Free Essays
1899 words (5.4 pages)

The Infamous Civil War Prison Andersonville Essay

- The Infamous Civil War Prison Andersonville The Confederacy established Andersonville, that most infamous of Civil War prisons, in late February, 1864. It built a stockade in west central Georgia to accommodate approximately 10,000 prisoners of war. As the fighting moved ever deeper into the South in the last year of the war, the expanded stockade at one point held nearly 33,000 Union soldiers. The termination by the North of the prisoner of war exchanges which had existed previously and the continually depleting resources of the Confederacy left these prisoners stranded in miserable conditions....   [tags: Papers]

Better Essays
3953 words (11.3 pages)

Comparing the Treatment of Prisoners of War in the Andersonville and the Rock Island Prison Camp during the Civil War

- A. Plan of investigation The ethics and rules of war have been a fiercely debated topic for centuries. One facet of war that is particularly divisive is the treatment of prisoners of war. This investigation compares the treatment of prisoners of war in the Andersonville and Rock Island prison camps during the American Civil War. Andersonville and Rock Island are widely regarded as the harshest prison camps of the Confederate and Union armies, respectively. The conditions of each camp will be examined and compared using factors such as nutrition, living arrangements, habits of camp leaders, and death rates....   [tags: ethics and rules of war]

Better Essays
1709 words (4.9 pages)

Avoiding the Grave at Andersonville: Three Young Men from Leopold, Indiana, Survive the Civil War Prison

- ... Henry Devillez remembers arriving on June 18, 1864, and states, “. . . we [Naviaux, Devillez, and both Rogier brothers] beheld misery on all sides. Sickness and death by hundreds was the program every day.” Over time the creek banks gave way and resulted in the whole compound becoming a swamp infested with maggots and lice. The pests would find homes in the wounds of soldiers and kill their hosts from within. (Devillez 2) Open skies let the scorching sun reign down on the imprisoned, resulting in extreme humidity; the towering walls of the stockade would not allow fresh air to waft through for relief (Hackmann 1)....   [tags: hostages, our Lady of Consolation]

Better Essays
1521 words (4.3 pages)

The Andersonville Trial Essay

- “…and on the charge that the prisoner did with others to conspire to destroy the lives of soldiers in the military service of the United States in violation of the laws and customs of war-Guilty” were the words that soared out of Wallace’s mouth at the end of the trial. It was then that Henry Wirz was found guilty. Why. Why was he found guilty. This decision was based on the emotional aspect of the witnesses, and not by the actual guilt. Not only my defense, but also the defense of Wirz’s attorney, Baker, the testimony of the defendant, Henry Wirz, shows that Wirz should not have been found guilty....   [tags: The American Civil War]

Better Essays
1251 words (3.6 pages)

Essay on Analysis Of Homer 's ' Near Andersonville '

- Winslow Homer (1836–1910) is regarded as one of American’s greatest artists in the 19th Century. Many of his works, such as “The Cotton Pickers,” “The Bright Side,” and “Prisoners from the Front,” are still very well-known and famous pieces of art. At the start of his artist career, he was a print maker and design chief for Harper’s Weekly Magazine; but during the course of the Civil War, his art took on a much deeper meaning as a result of it (“Winslow Homer and his paintings”). Homer’s works began to reflect on the effects the Civil War had on the nation, her people, and himself (Wood)....   [tags: American Civil War, Slavery in the United States]

Better Essays
1504 words (4.3 pages)

Essay on Andersonville (the Movie)

- Andersonville (the Movie) “Five hundred men moved silently toward the gates that would shut out life and hope for most of them forever. Quarter of a mile from the railroad we came into a massive palisade with great squared logs standing upright in the ground. Fires blazed up and showed us a section of these and two massive wooden gates with heavy iron hinges and bolts. They swung open as we stood there and we passed through into the space beyond. We were at Andersonville.” – Private John McElroy....   [tags: Art]

Better Essays
869 words (2.5 pages)

Civil War Prison camps Essay

- Civil War Prison Camps It was 1864 when Horatio Kirkland Foote was taken to a prison camp. Horatio was taken to Andersonville which is located in south-west Georgia where within the 14 months that the prison was open over 45,000 other people were taken as well. Andersonville was the largest prison camp out of more than 150 recorded camps between both sides. When Horatio was at Andersonville, the conditions were vile along with all prison camps of the Civil War. If you were in one of the prisons you could expect to be deprived of clothing, nutrition, and stable living conditions....   [tags: American History]

Better Essays
919 words (2.6 pages)

Prison Overcrowding And Prison Prisons Essay

- The number of Americans that are in prison has elevated to levels that have never been seen before. Prisons in the US have always been crowded ever since the first prison was invented (Jacobs and Angelos 101). The first prison in the US was the Walnut Street Jail that was built in Philadelphia in 1773, and later closed in the 1830’s due to overcrowding and dirty conditions (Jacobs and Angelos 101). The prison system in modern US history has faced many downfalls due to prison overcrowding. Many private prison owners argue that the more inmates in a prison the more money they could make....   [tags: Prison, Recidivism, Prison gang, Penology]

Better Essays
1058 words (3 pages)