Ancient Egyptian Objects : The Horus Cippus Essay

Ancient Egyptian Objects : The Horus Cippus Essay

Length: 1739 words (5 double-spaced pages)

Rating: Better Essays

Open Document

Essay Preview

Many Egyptian objects are not commonly known; one of these objects is the Horus Cippus. By looking at its’ physical features as well as at other comparable objects, it is possible to learn a lot about cippi (plural) and their importance in Ancient Egyptian society. It is seen that the Horus Cippus from the museum in Berkeley served a crucial religious importance because of its use of water and the power of Horus in curing various illnesses; this cippus is very personalized, portable, has many uses, and empowers common Egyptian people for these reasons. While we learn a lot about this specific cippus by comparing it to other objects, it is first important to look at the physical features of the given cippus to examine what can initially be learned about it.
There are a lot of physical features about the Horus cippus that make it distinct from other cippi or Ancient Egyptian objects. It is a very small, dark brown object that is shaped like a rectangle, is made of an unknown kind of rock, and was found in Tebtunis of the Faiyum region of Egypt (Hearst Museum). Horus cippi are described in detail in Allen’s The Art of Medicine in Ancient Egypt. He writes about many of the recurring symbols on cippi: the Egyptian God, Horus, standing with a winged sun disk sitting on top of him, in addition to nine other Gods as well (Allen 63). He is shown killing other dangerous animals, such as alligators. The additional main point is that there are many written inscriptions on the sides of the cippus, which are written spells that are intended to cure various illnesses. To use the cippus, people would put water into the holy libation disk and pour the water over the cippus. After this, people would collect and drink the water or throw it over the...


... middle of paper ...


...ere may not be a use for this object in the after life, the use of it while the person was alive was immense. It not only served an immediate purpose to heal people of their problems, but had many implications about Egyptian religion and Egyptian society that had an immense effect on the people living in the time period. Comparing the cippus to others like it and inspecting it carefully all help one to reach these conclusions.
After making comparisons and making careful observations about the cippus, one will realize that this very small object had a very profound object on Egyptian society. Although Egyptian medicine was very primitive, this cippus caused Egyptians to believe in their religion and provided them with faith while also empowering them to be on the same level as others in society. Whoever said a “little rock” couldn’t give people so much faith and hope?

Need Writing Help?

Get feedback on grammar, clarity, concision and logic instantly.

Check your paper »

Ancient Egyptians And The Egyptian Culture Essay

- The ancient Egyptians were a very creative group of people, whether they were documenting moments in their history, creating works of art, or showing reverence to their leaders and gods. When they did this, they showed an appreciation for symbolism, symmetry and color. In doing so, many of their works were entwined with their cultural beliefs and practices. This allowed them to demonstrate the way they saw the world physically and spiritually. As a nation the ancient Egyptians expressed their culture through murals, jewelry and monuments which had an influence on history and proved to represent them as a historical world power....   [tags: Ancient Egypt, Egypt, Ramesses II, Egyptians]

Better Essays
884 words (2.5 pages)

Essay about The Evolving Techniques Of Egyptian Art

- Seemingly static in appearance, to the untrained eye, Egyptian Art is somewhat formal and blocky, with very little to no naturalism; in opposition to ancient western art such as Greek and Roman artistic traditions. (Neer, 2012) However, Egyptian Art serves a purpose that celebrates the afterlife as well as appreciating life. Egyptian visual imagery expressed animals not in the typically assumed static and rigid form, but in naturalistic dynamism that is largely ignored in general Egyptian Art scholarship....   [tags: Ancient Egypt, Egypt, Egyptians, Egyptian language]

Better Essays
2976 words (8.5 pages)

The Statue Of Khasekhemwy : Ancient Egyptian Logographic And Alphabetic Elements

- The Statue of Khasekhemwy is a carved in-the-round sculpture made from painted limestone. It stands smaller than life size at about two feet in height. The sculpture represents Pharaoh Khasekhemwy in a straight, upright and frontal pose on the throne. Khasekhemwy places his right arm on his lap, while his left arm embraces his body. Unfortunately, both of his hands are destroyed. Covered by a tight-fitting robe, the subject wears a tall and conical hat above his head. Pharaoh Khasekhemwy sits on a low-backed throne with incised figures on the either sides of his seat....   [tags: Ancient Egypt, Egypt, Egyptian language]

Better Essays
1012 words (2.9 pages)

Analysis Of The Article ' Illusionism On The Egyptian Architecture ' By Alexander Badawy

- In the article, “Illusionism in the Egyptian Architecture” by Alexander Badawy, the author clearly described and explained the range of illusionistic effects, from reproduction of certain element to conceptual illusions presented in different Ancient Egyptian architectures. For each of the illusionistic effects, the author provided one or more examples, and postulated the possible reasons and results in the application of that particular effect. The author noted that Ancient architecture, like all Egyptian art is functional in nature, and the incorporation of illusion is to achieve a particular function....   [tags: Ancient Egypt, Egypt, Egyptian hieroglyphs]

Better Essays
733 words (2.1 pages)

An Analysis of Egyptian Mythology Essay

- The Egyptian religion is a complex subject, full of names, stories, family tree’s, and many gods to fill each of these clusters. Understanding of the deities of the ancient is one of the biggest mysteries Egypt has to offer. While many scholars differ on their idea of the gods relation to one another, their names, and how their stories are arranged- the following gods are the general backbone of the religion. These are the gods who were thought to rule during the ‘First Time’, or the Golden Age of ancient Egypt....   [tags: egypt, egyptian religion, ra, osiris]

Better Essays
1851 words (5.3 pages)

Ancient Egyptian Art And Culture Essay

- Life for Ancient Egyptians was very repetitive; drought and flood, abundance of food and starvation, riches and poverty. The Egyptians credited this static rhythm to their Gods and how well they worshipped them and their pharaoh. This unchanging lifestyle is reflected in their art. The main purpose of Ancient Egyptian artwork was religion; therefore the artists were very conservative when creating their paintings and sculptures. This is the reason that the style of the Ancient Egyptian’s artwork remained largely unchanged from 2500 BCE to 1300 BCE....   [tags: Ancient Egypt, Egypt, Ancient Egyptian religion]

Better Essays
1063 words (3 pages)

Essay on Egyptian Deities

- The Egyptian religion is a complex subject, full of names, stories, family tree’s, and many gods to fill each of these clusters. Understanding of the deities of the ancient is one of the biggest mysteries Egypt has to offer. While many scholars differ on their idea of the gods relation to one another, their names, and how their stories are arranged- the following gods are the general backbone of the religion. These are the gods who were thought to rule during the ‘First Time’, or the Golden Age of ancient Egypt....   [tags: ancient history, egyptian religion]

Better Essays
1852 words (5.3 pages)

The Egyptian Process of Mummification Essay

- The Egyptian Process of Mummification In ancient Egyptian society, preserving a body after death was an important process necessary for entrance into an immortal existence. According to Egyptian belief the soul did not die. The soul would take the form of a bird usually a falcon and fly around in the world of the living returning later its dead body. The importance of preserving the body revolved around the idea that the roaming soul would be able to recognize the right body and return to it....   [tags: Ancient Egypt Egyptian History]

Better Essays
900 words (2.6 pages)

Ancient Egyptian Religious Architecture Essay examples

- Ancient Egyptian Religious Architecture One of the greatest cultural achievements of Ancient Egypt was undoubtedly in their architecture associated with religion. "Temples, tombs and pyramids - all have witnessed this earth for thousands of years. What better than to say that these architectural achievements show us that Egypt's greatest virtue lay in its architecture" (Fumeaux:11, 1964) When one travels to Egypt, what does he/she see - pyramid after temple after tomb, each standing the test of time....   [tags: Ancient Egypt Egyptian History]

Free Essays
1288 words (3.7 pages)

Essay about Egyptian Myths and Legends

- Egyptian Myths and Legends Egyptian creation stories tell of several variations of how the world was composed. According to one variation, the ocean was the only thing in existence. Then the sun, Ra, came out of an egg (or a flower in some versions) that appeared on the surface of the water. Ra created four children. They were the gods Shu and Geb and the goddesses Tefnut and Nut. Shu and Tefnut became the air, who stood on Geb, the earth, and held up Nut, who became the sky. Ra ruled over all....   [tags: Ancient Egypt Egyptian Literature Theology Essays]

Better Essays
3681 words (10.5 pages)