Analysis Of The Wilmington Morning Star, Wilmington 's Black Working Class Women Crafted Politics Of Recognition

Analysis Of The Wilmington Morning Star, Wilmington 's Black Working Class Women Crafted Politics Of Recognition

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Through “unruly actions” described in the Wilmington Morning Star, Wilmington’s black working class women crafted politics of recognition in the streets. This politics of recognition contained multiple layers of assertion and protection. Wilmington’s working class black females asserted their concept of womanhood and also redefined the lines of marriage. These women also demanded protection through their unruly actions in the streets; protection from perhaps physical abuses at home and political and economic mistreatment in the public sphere.
Besides openly resisting physical abuse and oppression in the work place and at home and bringing these issues to the streets, these women also demanded social recognition through their behavior; this was made apparent through their vocal resistance, including foul language, as well as their resistance to arrest. Like the individual with the works of Kelley and Scott, these women were political in the sense of the everyday political action and forms of resistance they demonstrated. Their actions were not tied to established organizations or movements within the traditional spectrum. These women demanded recognition not just as women, but also as citizens, and they commanded it through their unruly actions. For these working class black women, citizenship meant more than just claiming womanhood but also meant the right to protection both privately and publicly, and the right to be heard and recognized as citizens of the New South, and as women on their own terms.
Wilmington’s working class black women lived within a transforming society. When referring to the New South, this thesis followed the argument of C. Vann. Woodward who stated that the identities of the old and New South were separate....


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...h reports; however, most importantly it explores how the city’s black working class women politics of recognition with layers of assertion and protection through the “disorderly” behavior. Chapter two focuses upon the women’s strive to bring attention to their need for protection in the public and private spheres, while also considering what a white press gains through the “disorderly,” violence description of the women and sentencing of outrageous fines. Chapter three turns to look at the verbal assertion of the black working class women’s politics of recognition through their foul language, drunken behavior, resistance to arrest, and other miscellaneous unruly actions. Finally, the conclusion of this thesis evaluates the impact of the black working class women’s politics of recognition upon the Wilmington Race Riot, and, in turn, the potential silencing of women.

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