Essay about Analysis Of The Poem ' To Wilberforce ' By Anna Barbauld

Essay about Analysis Of The Poem ' To Wilberforce ' By Anna Barbauld

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In Anna Barbauld’s Poem “Epistle to Wilberforce”, throughout the poem and throughout history the function of race plays a major role in slavery. Barbauld’s intention of writing this was to persuade higher authorities into changing their views on slavery by shaming them with satire to take action and fix the issue rather than debating about it. Her concern for human rights was the foundation for writing the poem and using her opinions to get her point across. She used a lot of oxymorons to paint a picture of vivid imagery. Barbauld makes it pretty obvious that she is using sarcasm to show the evil that is incorporated into slavery. She is constantly describing daily life and harsh treatment of a slave to drastically influence others. The main people benefiting from slavery were higher authorities and they were not easy to persuade. Even though Barbauld is not African-American or a slave, she still realizes the inhumane actions and the function of a race on slavery.
A very important part of improving everyone’s daily life is to make the reader aware of the harsh treatment and punishments the slaves went through every day throughout their lives. Race plays a major role in how they are treated because they are seen as different from the slaves simply because of their skin color. Barbauld knew this was wrong because only one race was being mistreated, and they were not paid in currency only with food, clothing, and shelter. These slaves were forced into free labor simply for the fact that it was good business for countries trying to expand its boundaries and improve its economy. The main reason she talks frequently about the treatment of slaves in her poem is because it is inhumane and anyone of higher authority did not listen to them ...


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Barbauld along with other men and women realized that race was a function of slavery which stems from inhumane actions. Not just slaves fought against slavery, some white Europeans were against slavery. This shows that because of race they were viewed as slaves and not treated as human beings. By describing through vivid imagery, the harsh treatment and the daily lives of the slave she was able to persuade her readers. Barbauld uses satire to shame her readers into changing their views on slavery. Her concern for human rights led to a drastic influence of others. Barbauld uses sarcasm to show the evil incorporated into slavery. Slaves were not treated the same as everyone until Lincoln took a stand for everyone’s rights and the constitution. Barbauld was an important aspect in the changing of slave labor because she realized there was a function of race on slavery.

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