Analysis Of The Poem ' Homecoming ' By Bruce Dawe Essay

Analysis Of The Poem ' Homecoming ' By Bruce Dawe Essay

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By the centre, march! Left right, left right…. Can you imagine dying for your country’s freedom as a frontline combat soldier, or does the thought of studying poetry make you feel like firing a bullet into your own head? Take heart; don’t pull the trigger just yet, poetry can invigorate your senses and teach you valuable lessons.
War destroys thousands of lives, but yet, the heroism of our fallen allows us to enjoy a privileged lifestyle, but their sacrifice often goes unnoticed. For this reason, Georgie and I have chosen war for our theme.
Bruce Dawe was born in Fitzroy, Victoria and is one of Australia’s most highly regarded poets. While serving in the air force, he was infuriated by the senseless slaughter of the Vietnam War. This motivated him to write, “Homecoming.” Ironically, the author is not writing about a happy time as the title would suggest.
The purpose of this poem is to enlighten readers to the futility of war. It conveys the message that war is unavailing and a waste of human life. Dawe expresses the notion that Vietnam War Veterans were not appreciated or honored. The poet wonderfully delivers his message by the skilful use of repetition of the suffix “ing.” “Bringing them home, picking them up, zipping them up, tagging them, rolling them out.” When these lines are read aloud their rhythm provokes an image of drums beating in a funeral march for soldiers coming home not as heroes, but as nameless, bagged rubbish of war.
The poet cleverly utilizes personification in the third stanza, “Telegrams tremble like leaves from a wintering tree.” This provides the reader with a powerful image of the colossal number of dead soldiers and exemplifies the burden of bad news that must be delivered to families. With the aid of...


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...xploring the theme of war. His instinctive use of imagery, juxtaposition and personification is captivating. He aptly reveals the sacrifice experienced by a soldier as he nobly forfeits his life for his country. Immersed beneath the words and phrases, lies an underlying message that sheds light on the suffering endured by our War veterans and their families for the sake of our freedom.
Through examination of both these poems, we have been inspired to develop a deeper appreciation of the freedom and opportunities that we enjoy as Australians. Even though Georgie and I have never experienced firsthand the misfortune of war, the importance of analysing poems about this topic does not diminish. For the sacrifices that our veterans make, it is our duty to honour them at this moment with pride, as they are the ones who have fought and are still fighting our battles today.

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