Analysis Of The Poem ' Desert Solitaire ' Essay

Analysis Of The Poem ' Desert Solitaire ' Essay

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Desert Solitaire aims to draw attention to the activities of a man voluntarily isolated in nature. It seeks to identify the strife that Abbey faces with modern day human’s treatment of his nature. As such, the argument that Abbey poses in one his earlier chapters Rocks is, that the Modern Day man is destructive and cannot be trusted to preserve nature as is.
In the initial chapters of Desert Solitaire, it is crystal clear that Abbey has formed his own concrete assumption that mankind is out to destroy what god has put on this Earth. “Men come and go, cities rise and fall, whole civilizations appear and disappear—the earth remains, slightly modified.” Abbey’s style profuse with descriptive literary devices exemplifies the reverence he displays for nature and the frustration that he feels towards his fellow human beings. His descriptions are overflowing with simile: "all the rosy desert cooling like a griddle with the fire turned off." Some phrases may sound like metaphor at first until the audience is able to remember that Abbey is writing a celebration of fact, so when fogbanks "fade into nothing before the wind and sunlight," they literally scatter under the combined influence of wind and sunlight. This then brings us to his use of imagery, initially illustrated by trading "dissipate" for "fade." Part of the grace of "simple fact" is rooted in strong sensory linguistics which also adds to an atmosphere of grandeur and the convincing tone of overwhelming satisfaction, which can be heard by all readers. This tone only adds to highlight the Abbey’s frustration.
Throughout the entirety of the novel, Abbey focuses upon on the natural beauty of the land and how, humans as a civilization have ruined it through the creation of new ind...


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...as used Rocks as a pathway to many other arguments he makes. Initially he decided that mankind was the destroyer, however he separated himself from this group. He was a lone individual, “saving” the environment from the rest of mankind. He seemed to imply that only he was putting the effort into saving a lacking resource, nature. However as the memoir progresses, his views slowly shift to accommodate his new experiences. He begins to demonstrate the idea that maybe he is a part of the whole. No matter how hard he tries, he will never not be human. He can never be isolated and non-influenced by social cues. In the end he realizes that he too is a part of the destructive race, bringing down nature as it was in the past. Evolution of mankind lead to evolution of intelligence and caused the development of new technologies. “Will anything ever be quite the same again?”

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