Analysis of The Mayflower and the Pilgrims´ New World by Nathaniel Philbrick

Analysis of The Mayflower and the Pilgrims´ New World by Nathaniel Philbrick

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The Mayflower and the Pilgrims' New World, by Nathaniel Philbrick (winner of the Massachusetts Book Award) is a captivating historical novel that explores the account of the Pilgrims and their involvement in the New World. It is a story of the Puritans (who would later become the Pilgrims), as they travel to the New World, a place they can hope to worship their God in the way they want to without any persecution and/or animosity from their fellow man since no European nation was safe for them. While reading Philbrick’s novel I (and most likely many other readers), compared the historical text in The Mayflower to how we personally see the world today. Furthermore, I learned from the text of The Mayflower, my views were challenged within the confines of the text, and though it might not address my problems on a personal level—it still addresses things that are considered important to not just me, but people around the world.
The one thing that was consistently illustrated in The Mayflower was determination. It is with determination that the Puritans were able to escape a life of maltreatment in Europe. They even went as far as becoming part of a company called The Adventurers, to raise money for their voyage to the New World. Furthermore, it was through their willpower (and help from local Indians) that they were able to survive a desolate area, filled with the unburied bodies of Indians who perished to diseases that were brought by the explorers years ago. In this bizarre and somewhat terrifying setting, the Puritans had to try to stay alive. This relates to how I see the world because in my eyes, one can get nowhere without determination and willpower. It was due to those two things (and an investment by The Adventurers), that al...


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...ess of who gets hurt. I began to wonder if it was truly evil to take what one desires, to satisfy your own gluttony even if doing so will cause someone else pain. For a split second, I thought of evil as a suitable answer to an unforgiving and prejudiced world.
Though Philbrick’s intended audience was most likely ‘history enthusiasts,’ (a group I am not part of), his book The Mayflower still was able to peak my interest because of how it demonstrated the value of willpower, whether it is used rightly or wrongly. Willpower is something I consider important because I believe that with it one can accomplish their goals, and without it one cannot achieve anything, something the Puritans demonstrated throughout the book.



Works Cited

Philbrick, Nathaniel, and Nathaniel Philbrick. The Mayflower and the Pilgrims' New World. New York, NY: G.P. Putnam's Sons, 2008. Print.

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