Analysis Of The Hebrew ' Exodus ' Essay

Analysis Of The Hebrew ' Exodus ' Essay

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In relation, of the African American slaves’ and their identification with the experiences of the Hebrew slaves in the “Book of Exodus” have been evidently strong historically. Slavery in America began when Europeans brought the first African slaves to the North American colony of Jamestown, Virginia, in 1619. They African slaves were brought in to aid in the production of lucrative crops such as tobacco, cotton, and sugar. In addition, are the Hebrew/Israelites slaves in the “Book of Exodus,” it tells how the Israelites leaves their bondages with Egypt’s Pharaohs at the time. The Hebrew, escaped their grip through the strength of “Yahweh” is the name of God in Judaism.
There are several similarities with the African American slaves, in relation to the Hebrew/Israelites in the “Book of Exodus.” First, is the most obvious similarity is the fact that these group were enslave in the purpose of working for their oppressor. These two groups work tirelessly day in and day out for their master’s satisfaction, either be in the hot desert in Egypt at the time making blocks of stones, and dragging them to the location where the Pharaoh’s desired to build their pyramids. In addition, is the African American slaves working for their master’s satisfaction working in the plantation fields to plant and harvest cash crops such as cotton, sugar canes, and tobacco; these cash crops were very profitable at the time, and it made the masters rich since they do not have to pay the African workers any salaries for their work they could keep all the profit.
Another, similarity is the paranoia the slave owner’s and the pharaoh’s experienced because they fear an uprising from the people they enslaved. As an illustration, the total number of slaves per ...


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...ds their slaves working for them. Moreover, to the slave owners had justified that for holding the African American people in bondage of slavery as acceptable. For instance, they based on the logic of African Americans were a lesser race who needed to take care of by white patriarchs to the economic justification, slave owners were constantly trying to find new ways to argue those who disagree with their decision to hold others in captivity.
The Christian religion had a positive effect on Mrs. Lee, she found a salvation through the Christian faith and she became one of the prominent figure to preach the word of the Lord. In contrast, is Douglas’s negative experience with the religious slave owners on how they used Christianity as a binding force to keep the African American slaves in captivity to force them to work tirelessly for the slave owner’s economical gains.

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