Analysis Of The Book ' Romans ' And The Apocalyptic World View Of The Book Of Revelation

Analysis Of The Book ' Romans ' And The Apocalyptic World View Of The Book Of Revelation

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Rita Frolova
REL 371
Assignment #5

'The Importance of the Book of Romans, ' 'Women in Paul 's Churches, ' and 'The Apocalyptic World View of the Book of Revelation. '

The book of Romans was written by Paul, it is actually the second book after the four gospels. It is more of an explanation of who Jesus was instead of the continuation of the gospels. It allows a rendition of his life, and how he came to have a relationship with us. It is somewhat of a doctrine of things that Jesus has done for the people and an explanation of how to be saved. It was written for several groups of people. Particularly for those who were not born of God, the gentiles. It was also written for the Jewish people as well as to the church of God. It teaches how to worship, have love, and believe in God.
Rome played a large role in beginning of western society. The people in this society were progressive, smart, well rounded, informed, educated, and open minded. Because of these qualities Paul had a long role ahead of him attempting to explain why the Jewish religion is of great importance to them. He expressed that by excepting Jesus as the prophecy they would be able to be forgiven and find salvation for their sins and in turn would be allowed into Gods Kingdom and well as be apart of Gods family tree.
It is an inherent request to all of the Christians to hold on to that faith. They were to oppose any stress put on them to accept a doctrine of salvation through works of the law. At the same time they are not to embellish Christian freedom as an relinquishment of accountability for others or as a denial of God 's law and will. I personally think that it teaches the most significant outcome of Jesus’s death on the cross. I also think it was the ...


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...at is happening on a larger scale than before the time that spiritually had begun. So basically all of the powers that God had used to construct the world are continuing and are returning again to our possession and they are embodying as people as well as places who are harmonious, nonviolent, caring and working on their problems with God. Through this process they will gain peace that will assist them long enough to endure the "false peace" that follows but is then removed by whatever has to occur to bring the Apocalypse and then we must ourselves teach spirituality from a state of lack that follows it. After we gain this peace we must use this for the purpose of good. These books are meant to motivate and inspire others to be better individuals and give assurance to their audience that explains the suffering of Gods people and at the same time promises vindication.

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