Essay about Analysis Of Stephen Crane 's ' Clockwork Angel '

Essay about Analysis Of Stephen Crane 's ' Clockwork Angel '

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While it has already been made clear that the use of language by Stephen Crane helps facilitate the meaning of the story, there are ways in which it can be changed to reflect the time period of Cassandra Clare 's Clockwork Angel, without taking away from the overall message. This is accomplished by making the majority of the changes solely to the world building sections, rather than the dialog itself. Take for instance this section:
Evenings during the week he took her to see plays in which the brain-clutching heroine was rescued from the palatial home of her guardian, who is cruelly after her bonds, by the hero with the beautiful sentiments. The latter spent most of his time out at soak in pale-green snow storms, busy with a nickel-plated revolver, rescuing aged strangers from villains. (Crane 42-43)
The first issue that arise when looking at this section from the point of view of modern English, is the very first sentence. Starting the paragraph with the phrase "Evenings during the week he took her to see plays," may be understood in modern English, but it doesn 't fit with standard practices of our language. Rather than starting out with the word 'evenings ', it is more common to start of with the prepositional phrase, 'During the week '. While this removes the clarification of the character taking her out during evenings, this can be remedied by using evening as an adjective in front of plays. This way, the overall meaning of the line is retained, but the sentence structure is more typical of current language practices. There are other instances throughout the work that could benefit from similarly small syntax changes. Another example would be, “Valiant noise was made on a stage at the end of the hall by an orches...


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...ily help the meaning of the story. The majority of the language is modern and the use of a few words that might have been more common during the Victorian era simply come off as superficial. It is only when compared to Stephen Crane 's use of language that we can see some aspects of the use of language that lend themselves to facilitating the meaning. We see Tessa 's eloquence in dialog despite her social status as allowing her to join with the world of the nephilim despite not really being of their word. Without Maggie 's similar starting point to compare it to, however, the reader doesn 't ever make this connection. Readers of Clockwork Angel only really come to understand the story as that of a girl finding her place in a fantastical world, rather than seeing it as the story of a girl overcoming her lot in life through education in order to lead a better life.

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