Analysis Of Stephen Crane 's ' A Man Adrift On A Slim Spar ' Essay

Analysis Of Stephen Crane 's ' A Man Adrift On A Slim Spar ' Essay

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The poetry of Stephen Crane, at first glance over, might be taken as poetry against religion, depicting the god in a harsh, cold manner. But Stephen Crane does not write his poetry to denounce religion and a god, but he writes it with the mindset to disillusion the fanatics who only see one side of the equation. For Stephen Crane sees more to know better than to just blindly accept the religion he’s a part of, or any predominant religion for that matter, as wholly good and just based solely on the fact that it’s a religion following a god.
In the poem “A Man Adrift on a Slim Spar”, the phrase “God is cold” (Crane) is repeated constantly throughout. This phrase is only written in this poem, but it is apparent in the telling of the other poems, that “God is cold”, and that it’s expected for that point to come across to the reader. And if they hadn’t read “A Man Adrift on a Slim Spar”, they would of found, most likely, through the other poems that it is implied that “God is cold”. Apart from that fact, this poem follows the peril of a man adrift at sea, undoubtedly a cold sea, for man...

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