Analysis Of Sherman Alexie 's ' Brave New World ' Essay

Analysis Of Sherman Alexie 's ' Brave New World ' Essay

Length: 1507 words (4.3 double-spaced pages)

Rating: Better Essays

Open Document

Essay Preview

In Brave New World the social conditioning causes the characters to struggle with their acceptance of their place within society. In Sherman Alexie’s Blasphemy the hereditary ties to the modern and Indian culture causes a strife among the characters. In both works, characters such as Bernard and the narrator from The Toughest Indian in the World are seen to initially struggle with their self-identify through internal thought. However, their internal struggle soon seeps through to the exterior, which causes a defining act. I will argue that in both Blasphemy and Brave New World the characters cope with their identity crisis by internalizing everything until a breaking point is reached causing a defining moment which is something that is out of there typical character.
Bernard from Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World is an outsider within his elite caste which causes him to secludes himself and internalize his feelings. Bernard’s self-angst erupts while on the Indian reservation causing him to invite John back to civilization.. This ultimately leads to the uncharacteristic actions of Bernard when he is suddenly thrust into a high social positions and enjoys it. Bernard starts off solely holding on to all of his bitter feelings. This can be demonstrated by “Idiots, swine!” Bernard Marx was saying to himself, as he walked down the corridor to the lift.”(p.55) This quote illustrates Bernard’s feelings towards the other castes. He is insulting them within, which demonstrates his feelings of superiority yet, Bernard does not feel equal to his own caste. His struggle with self-identity can be further reflected by the quote “increased his sense of being alien and alone. A chronic fear of being slighted made him avoid his equal.” (p. 65) Both ...


... middle of paper ...


...
Overall, Bernard from Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World and the narrator from Blasphemy, the Toughest Indian in the World by Sherman Alexie both possess a struggle with self-identity. Both characters want to gain an intimacy with their separate cultures. They are both seen to not easily identify their place among society. This struggle is initially demonstrated through internalization. Bernard demonstrates his internal struggle by secluding himself and not actively participating in typical daily life. The narrator demonstrates his internal struggle by not being fully present in his daily activities. Both Bernard and the narrator hold in their true thoughts and desires. Soon the pent up emotional struggle breaks through the internal wall and can be demonstrated in a breaking point. Thus, a defining moment occurs where the character acts out of their usual pattern.

Need Writing Help?

Get feedback on grammar, clarity, concision and logic instantly.

Check your paper »

A Brave New World is Pending Essay

- A Brave New World is Pending In the March 6 issue of Science News, J. Raloff wrote "If pregnancies early in adulthood reduce a woman's lifelong risk of developing breast cancer, could short-term hormonal treatments that simulate aspects of pregnancy do the same thing. A new study suggest that the answer is yes." Reading that fast-forwarded my imagination to a horrible future, one described in Aldous Huxley's "Brave New World," where women of the future undergo surrogate pregnancies....   [tags: Brave New World Essays]

Free Essays
1335 words (3.8 pages)

Growing Up with No Hope in True Diary of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexie

- Can you imagine growing up on a reservation full of people with no hope. The character Arnold in the book The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexie did. In the beginning of the book, Arnold was a hopeless Native American living on a hopeless reservation. In the middle of the book, Arnold leaves the reservation and finds out that his sister left too. By the end of the book, Arnold experiences a lot of deaths of people who mean a lot to him but he still found hope. Arnold becomes a warrior for leaving the reservation and going to Reardan....   [tags: reservation, tribe, native americans]

Better Essays
553 words (1.6 pages)

Isolation in Brave New World Essay

- Isolation in Brave New World   "If one's different, one's bound to be lonely."  -John "The Savage" In the Brave New World, people who are different from the normal standard are alienated and isolated from society because of their individuality. The society of the Brave New World is structured and ordered – the government attempts to control everything. Alienation in the Brave New World can be categorized into three areas, appearance, intellect, and morals.               Bernard Marx was alienated in the Brave New World because of his general appearance....   [tags: Brave New World]

Better Essays
808 words (2.3 pages)

Distortion in Brave New World Essay

- Distortion in Brave New World Distortion is an image of a thought or idea that appears to have a single affect on a society, but in actuality provides one that is totally different. Often times in order for readers to understand the realism of today's society and the point that the author tries to make in presenting its flaws, the writer must distort reality. In doing this he urges the reader to engage in a deep thought process that forces them to realize the reality of a situation, rather than perceiving it to be good or evil based on the dilutions of individuals....   [tags: Brave New World Essays]

Better Essays
707 words (2 pages)

Imagine a Brave New World Essays

- Imagine a Brave New World         Imagine living in a world without mothers and fathers, a place in which all those around you are human clones with no personality, a vast array of people that are not seen as individuals but a social body. This society results from the absence of spirituality and family, the obsession with physical pleasure, and the misuse of technology. The society described above, becomes a reality in A Brave New World, a novel depicting how the advancement of science effects humanity....   [tags: Brave New World]

Better Essays
1241 words (3.5 pages)

1984 and Brave New World Essay

- 1984 and Brave New World Undoubtedly, the thought of living in, or forming a utopian society has flashed through nearly every person’s mind. A few people have even tried to make this ideal dream society a reality. Unfortunately, within the pursuit of these societies the leaders become corrupt and begin to become paranoid with the fear of rebellion. Hundreds of people were murdered during the reigns of Adolph Hitler and Joseph Stalin in what they considered measures to maintain peace and stability within their respective “perfect” society....   [tags: 1984 Brave New World]

Better Essays
1312 words (3.7 pages)

Civilization in Brave New World Essay

- Civilization in Brave New World        The dictionary defines civilized as "advanced in social customs, art, and science".  The keyword here is social customs.  A persons idea of what is civilized is relative to his culture.  Through out the history of man, one can see many changes in customs, and customs is what defines our idea of what is civilized.  The word civilized is one of the most relative concepts.        Time and distance are what have shaped our customs for thousands of years.  If we look back throughout history we can see many customs that may seem odd, or even barbaric, to us but were everyday events to these ancient people.  For example, the Aztec conducted sacrific...   [tags: Brave New World]

Free Essays
641 words (1.8 pages)

Essay about Happiness in Brave New World

- Happiness in Brave New World Huxley implies that by abolishing nastiness and mental pain, the brave new worlders have got rid of the most profound and sublime experiences that life can offer as well. Most notably, they have sacrificed a mysterious deeper happiness which is implied, but not stated, to be pharmacologically inaccessible to the utopians. The metaphysical basis of this presumption is obscure. There are hints, too, that some of the utopians may feel an ill-defined sense of dissatisfaction, an intermittent sense that their lives are meaningless....   [tags: Brave New World Essays]

Free Essays
1227 words (3.5 pages)

Essay about Conformity in Brave New World

- Conformity in Brave New World    The novel, Brave New World by Aldous Huxley first published in 1932, presents a very bleak out look of what future society will be like. The novel presents a future of where almost total conformity is a carefully guarded aspect of society. Even before one is "decanted" they are conditioned to fill a specific roll and to act a certain way.   Everyone, while still in their jar, is conditioned to fit into a specific caste. The castes range from Alpha Double Plus down to Epsilon Semi-Moron....   [tags: Brave New World]

Better Essays
1131 words (3.2 pages)

Brave New World: Helplessness Essay

- Brave New World: Helplessness How can one distinguish happiness from unhappiness if unhappiness is never experienced. It's the bad that makes the good look good, but if you don't know the good from the bad, you'll settle for what you're given. Can people judge their feelings without a basis or underlying "rubric" to follow. Such rudimentary guidelines are established through the maturation process and continue to fluctuate as one grows wiser with a vaster array of experiences. Aldous Huxley creates a utopia filled with happiness, but this is merely a facade to a world which is incomplete and quite empty since the essential "experiences" are replaced with "conditioning." Perhaps th...   [tags: Brave New World]

Better Essays
1084 words (3.1 pages)