Analysis Of Robinson Crusoe And Foe Essay

Analysis Of Robinson Crusoe And Foe Essay

Length: 1179 words (3.4 double-spaced pages)

Rating: Strong Essays

Open Document

Essay Preview

Freedom is a theme that appears multiple times throughout the entirety of both stories, Robinson Crusoe and Foe. Freedom is so called power where there are basically no rules. When a story has freedom as a concurrent theme, it means that the story has little restraint; there is a lot of room to act freely as one wishes. Robinson Crusoe and Foe are two different stories that can be compared through the theme of freedom. One will see throughout this writing, how much these two stories can relate as well as the major differences between the same yet, different meaning of freedom!
Robinson Crusoe is a man who yearns to go to sea and conduct trade. “Crusoe is an intelligent, curious, independent, hard-working, and risk-taking man who undergoes a spiritual awakening on the island on which he is marooned” (Cummings). Freedom is a theme and subject that appears time and time again throughout Robinson Crusoe; throughout the journeys that Crusoe embarks on, freedom is something he continuously yearns for and is also an idea that follows him throughout the story. This was something that appeared very early on in this story and continued throughout the entire novel. The first sign of freedom was when the story portrayed Robinson Crusoe as wanting to be so free and independent. The reader sees how Crusoe so deeply wants complete freedom through the very first act of him going against the plans his father had for him. Instead of following Crusoe’s father’s plan that was designed for him to go into the law, Crusoe decides he would rather go to sea. “So powerful is Robinson’s desire to travel that he embarks without even sending word to his parents” (Cummings). This shows the audience that he wants to have no limitations and make choices of his...


... middle of paper ...


...venture rather than lead a humdrum life in England” (Cummings). While in Foe, Susan Barton is in a search for freedom from basically poverty to the kind of lifestyle that Crusoe once had. They are in search for freedom on two totally different levels. This is the one feature that sets these two novels apart from one another when relating to the idea of freedom.
Freedom is a concurrent theme and or idea in both novels of Foe and Robinson Crusoe that relate in many ways yet are also very different. Robinson Crusoe and Susan Barton are both in a great search for freedom, both eventually finding freedom is some sort of way and reappearing throughout the entirety of both novels! Therefore, as one can see freedom hold such great importance in both stories, as both would probably not have a true backbone in being great stories without the great idea of freedom-being free!

Need Writing Help?

Get feedback on grammar, clarity, concision and logic instantly.

Check your paper »

Robinson Crusoe By Daniel Defoe Essay example

- Robinson Crusoe Analysis As boys grow into men they go through a series of changes, leaving them doubting both themselves and their beliefs. One specific author who explores this is Daniel Defoe, the author of Robinson Crusoe. In this publication, Defoe writes about a man who emerges from a series of catastrophes as a symbol of man’s ability to survive the tests of nature. Because of the many hardships that Defoe encountered throughout his life, writing about a man whose thoughts and internal struggles mirrored his own helps to give the publication a sense of realism....   [tags: Robinson Crusoe, Novel, Daniel Defoe]

Strong Essays
1172 words (3.3 pages)

Essay on Analysis Of Daniel Defoe 's ' Robinson Crusoe '

- According to encyclopedia.com, Daniel Defoe was an English man born in the 1660’s, who later died in 1737. Defoe was a successful business man, pamphleteer, and novelist, whose work to this day, is still valued. Defoe began his career in business in the late 1680’s doing trade work, and selling ship insurance. However this didn’t last long, in 1692 Daniel Defoe had to declare bankruptcy which in essence led him into a new career path as a journalist. Defoe started doing literary work and writing political pamphlets, some of which landed him in prison for libel....   [tags: Novel, Robinson Crusoe, Alexander Selkirk]

Strong Essays
702 words (2 pages)

Servantship in Robinson Crusoe and The Tempest Essay example

- Literature has always been a source of exploring the world and the history of mankind. In Daniel Defoe’s Robinson Crusoe and William Shakespeare’s The Tempest, both authors use the concept of slavery, race and class. In Defoe’s story, the relationship between Crusoe and his slave, Friday, is one of mutual respect and trust. In the second selection by Shakespeare, the master-slave relationship is one that is characterized by force, violence and power. These two works share the common theme of servantship and slavery, which were largely based on differences in class and race....   [tags: Robinson Crusoe Essays]

Strong Essays
1664 words (4.8 pages)

Essay about Analysis Of Daniel Defoe 's ' Robinson Crusoe '

- In Robinson Crusoe, Daniel Defoe writes under the guise of a shipwrecked man who establishes his own empire while alone on an island. In fact, the novel was originally published without Defoe 's name attached. Instead, it was presented as a true story as written by Crusoe to tell the world of his adventures. Robinson Crusoe is also known to have some very close parallels with John Locke 's Second Treatise of Government. In fact, some interpret it as a simply Locke 's ideas repackaged into a work of fiction....   [tags: Robinson Crusoe, Novel, Ibn Tufail]

Strong Essays
880 words (2.5 pages)

Essay on Analysis Of Daniel Defoe 's ' Robinson Crusoe '

- In Robinson Crusoe, Daniel Defoe writes under the guise of a shipwrecked man who establishes his own empire while alone on an island. In fact, the novel was originally published without Defoe 's name attached. Instead, it was presented as a true story as written by Crusoe to tell the world of his adventures. Robinson Crusoe is also known to have some very close parallels with John Locke 's Second Treatise of Government. In fact, some interpret it as a simply Locke 's ideas repackaged into a work of fiction....   [tags: Robinson Crusoe, Novel, Ibn Tufail]

Strong Essays
731 words (2.1 pages)

Robinson Crusoe as Ancient Hero Essay

- Eva Brann writes in her article “The Unexpurgated Robinson Crusoe” that Robinson Crusoe is the archetype, a model of a new man, soon to be predominant breed – a modern man. Crusoe is a rational man, with extraordinary capabilities, a lone individual and an individual that makes a culture of one. He is every man in one: a businessman, laborer, and accountant. He is the ultimate individualist. He does everything by himself, for himself. Nevertheless, what can be said about Robinson Crusoe’s modernity if while reading the novel he continued reminding me to an ancient Greek hero Jason....   [tags: Robinson Crusoe Essays]

Strong Essays
1898 words (5.4 pages)

Essay about Castaway: Robinson Crusoe

- “Thus fear of danger is ten thousand times more terrifying than danger itself when apparent to the eyes” (Defoe 116). The protagonist and also namesake of the book, Robinson Crusoe, has enough experience flirting with danger to be able to say the above quote with surety. Following the life of one man, the novel, Robinson Crusoe¸ records the adventures he has while on the sea. The main section of the book has Crusoe marooned on an island for nearly 30 years. One can assume that the events in Robinson Crusoe did not happen based on the following events, the ability he obtained supplies from the wrecked ship, his ability to build various objects, and variations from the true even...   [tags: Robinson Crusoe Essays]

Strong Essays
685 words (2 pages)

Essay about The Effect of God on Robinson Crusoe

- It has been observed that when placed in harsh or unusual conditions, people tend to look to spiritual support to help them overcome adversity. In Robinson Crusoe, Daniel Defoe not only depicts the struggle of a man abandoned on a deserted island, but also depicts Crusoe's repentance for past disobedience against his father and humanity as well as his acceptance of religion into his life. Crusoe's religious beliefs, however, do not remain consistent; in fact, he later uses religion as a justification for murder and other immoral acts....   [tags: Robinson Crusoe Essays]

Strong Essays
1052 words (3 pages)

Essay on Robinson Crusoe as an Unchanging Character

- Robinson Crusoe is a character we get to know extremely well, thanks to Daniel Defoe and his informative descriptions. Because of this we can see how Robinson's attitudes and beliefs may or may not change throughout the book. In this essay I will look at how they do or do not change, and decide on whether Robinson is a changing or unchanging character. "I was born in the year 1623, in the city of York, of a good family, though not of that country, my father being a foreigner....   [tags: Robinson Crusoe Essays]

Free Essays
874 words (2.5 pages)

Essay on Daniel Defoe and Robinson Crusoe

- Daniel Defoe was an extraordinary man. Although he never had the benefit of a university education, he spoke six languages and was able to read even more. His curriculum included having been a government spy, a shopkeeper, and a journalist. As the latter, he was employed by both major parties. Of course, serving two lord is impossible, so after he got into trouble with both of these parties, he turned to writing as another means of living. The first major difference between Defoe's work and most other books dating from this time is that Robinson Crusoe is really entertaining, quite exhilarating and at times even amusing to read....   [tags: Defoe Robinson Crusoe Essays]

Free Essays
1022 words (2.9 pages)