Analysis of Robert Frost´s Poem Birches Essay examples

Analysis of Robert Frost´s Poem Birches Essay examples

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In Robert Frost’s poem “Birches” the poem does not vaguely say who the narrator is but it is assumed it is a man. The poem draws a parallel between two worlds. The poem takes place on a winter morning in the woods with icy white birch trees scattering the landscape. The poem is not about the landscape, but rather the narrator images of his past. The birch tree’s branches question the narrator to what is real and what is not. This “swinging” event has a great effect on the narrator causing him to imagine “some boy's been swinging” in the birch tree “bending them to the left and right.” This is where reality takes over his imagination because of the fact that “swinging doesn't bend them down to stay”; ice-storms do that. The swinging and swaying of the branches has great consequences on the narrator. The narrator is taken from reality and talks of an escape from the reality of life. He wants to be on Earth again because "earth's the right place for love." He wants the leaving to be temporary. Swinging on the birch branch is a temporary departure from his own reality, it is his imagination. Reaching “heaven” is contingent on the fact that the narrator must reach towards those “higher branches.” Climbing the trunk slowly, “always pushing upward further away from imperfect burning, weeping, earth and truth but always ready at the top of the arc to swing back down to Earth again.”The narrator talks about what real effect that nature’s ice has on birch trees. Nature causes the branches to be weighed down. This event also has a consequence on the narrator. The narrator again shifts from the world of reality to the world of imagination.
The narrator’s creative imagination is based on the scene of mangled broken birch tree branches, “arche...


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...them to leave each other alone. I live next door to a family who has a white wooden fence between their yard and ours. We do not have a fence but rather a row of arborvitae trees. During this past summer our neighbor fixed the rotting part of their fence, which really hit home for me with this poem. There is a bit of fact to the idea that, “good fences make good neighbors.” But most people would not initially think of it that way. I believe that if a neighbor puts a tall fence to divide the property, they want no good neighbor but the fence itself to divide the two properties. Tearing down dividing walls leads to community and knowing one another. However putting up dividers leads an almost non-existent knowledge of the other neighbor. Neighbors may disagree whether to have a wall, a fence, or divider to separate them, but in fact, “good fences make good neighbors.”

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