Analysis Of Martin Luther King 's I Have A Dream Speech On The Steps Of The Lincoln Memorial

Analysis Of Martin Luther King 's I Have A Dream Speech On The Steps Of The Lincoln Memorial

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On August 28, 1963, Martin Luther King gave his famous “I Have a Dream” Speech on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial. He proclaimed his vision of a United States where black and whites were treated as equals. The citizens of the United States have elected a black president, but the nation still has a long way to go. Racial profiling is a problem that affects many minority groups. I will never forget when a security officer accused me of trying to steal a purse. Just because I am an African American female does not mean I can’t afford to buy a coach purse. I felt inclined to explore this issue after my experienced because I never want my child to go through the humiliation of being followed when shopping and accused of shoplifting. Racial profiling creates distrust between law enforcement and minority communities. It is essential that Congress pass the End Racial Profiling Act to minimize the negative effects of racial profiling in the United States because racial profiling is morally wrong and the law is crucial in order to provide legal protections for victims.
Racial profiling is morally wrong because it is based on false assumptions. According to James A. Kowalski, a contributor to the Huffington Post, racial profiling can be defined as “a controversial and illegal discriminatory practice in which individuals are targeted for suspicion of crime based on ethnicity, race, or religion rather than on evidence-based suspicious behavior” (Kowalski). Ones morals can be defined as “concerning or relating to what is right and wrong in human behavior” (Merriam Webster). Racial Profiling is an illegal practice; therefore society has accepted that racial profiling is morally wrong. Racial profiling stems from stereotypes. In modern day ...


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...ared unconstitutional after the Brown v. Board of Education decision, unfortunately segregation in public schools still continued. After some time the citizens of the United States adapted and that is why I am allowed to attend public school with teenagers of all different races. Racial Profiling is an illegal practice that continues today but with the passage of the End Racial Profiling it is possible to have a future with fewer racial profiling incidents. If the ERA is past it could improve the relationship between law enforcement in minority communities due to the reduced racial profiling. If Congress passes the End Racial Profiling Act it could positively impact the future of the country because it would provide legal protections for victims and help minimize the negative effects of racial profiling in the United States because racial profiling is morally wrong.

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