Analysis Of James Henry Hammond 's Life Essay

Analysis Of James Henry Hammond 's Life Essay

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In 1858, James Henry Hammond, one of south carolina’s elites made a public statement in a speech that became well known. He said “In all societies, there must be a class to do the menial duties, to perform the drudgery of life. With fewer skills and a “low order of intellect” the laboring class formed the base of the civilized nations. Every advanced society had to exploit its petty laborers; the working poor who wallowed in the mud allowed for a superior class to emerge on top. This recognized elite, the creme de la creme was the true society and the source of all “civilization, progress and refinement” [Isenberg[7]]. The elite were those who wanted all the power; and felt the need to have everyone work under them. They feel superior and have this mentality that the economy revolves around them, if not for their “hard work” the economy would not be as strong or stable [Isenberg[12]]. This view on society, is the reason as of to why, the working class is treated like rubbish. They are overworked, treated unfairly and put in unsafe conditions; at the end of it all the elites get all the money and attention. This source of power is overrated what many don’t realize is that it is the working class which keeps the economy from failing; if this isn’t realized soon then it is only a matter of times before things go sour.
The owners of capital, the bourgeoisie and the society’s intellectuals, all of whom comprised the elites of society, viewed the working class as a group of people whose sole purpose was to offer their sweat and their time in backbreaking labor towards the success of large profiting industries which would make the rich wealthier and the elite more powerful. In 1858, James Henry Hammond, one of South Carolina’s elites m...


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... between the two classes. The working class was worked to the death and earned little for it and could barely survive above the poverty line. In essence, the elites believed the working class identity meant nothing but an undignified and inconsequential status in society that was only needed to label a group of people who slaved to make them prosperous and the society they lived in.
Through the 18th century till the 19th century, the working class identity was a fluid one, changing with the economy and the social status of many. The working class at that time, finally decided to take a stance against the elites and the factory owners. It was also, a time for women to be heard, and respected as well as treated the same as men. As for children it became a law for children under fourteen, to not be allowed to work. To sum up, it was time where justice was being served.

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