Essay on Analysis Of Homer 's The Odyssey And The Lliad

Essay on Analysis Of Homer 's The Odyssey And The Lliad

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“It is not flesh and blood but the heart which makes us fathers and sons.”
-Friedrich Schiller
In this essay I will be discussing the father/son relationship in Homer’s most famous poems. The father in The Odyssey whom is Odysseus and his relationship with his son, Telemachus who becomes more and more important over the course of the story. Like Odysseus, Telemachus is undertaking his own journey in an important side supporting story to Odysseus 's return voyage to Ithaca. By examining this side story and the character and trials of Telemachus, the reader is able to tell how Ithaca will go on once Odysseus dies. Telemachus is clearly following in his father 's footsteps, and Ithaca will be in good hands.
There are many obvious facts that are identified about the nature of a father-son relationships in Homer’s most famous poems The Odyssey and The lliad, before you can even start reading the story. Such as the person reading is already aware of the male controlled structure and organization of the ancient Greek society. The position men held was praised, especially those men who were strong and daring. Their sons were awarded if they promised to follow their father’s noble achievements and display the skills that would show that they could do so. In The Odyssey, there is no surprise that the relationships that Odysseus and Telemachus has is, respectively, and is as admiring as they are. Odysseus is very proud of his son, who show such potential, and Telemachus is likewise proud of his father, who have earned fortunate reputations as warriors who defended their territory bravely. But however, the only way this father-son aff...


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...o by appealing to Achilles’ relationship with his own father. It is even more significant that his appeal to the enemy’s sense of devoted loyalty and emotion worked in his favor.
In conclusion, there is textual evidence to support the claims that both Odysseus and Telemachus were willing to overcome scary obstacles in order to meet each other again after being apart for so many years and to reunite their family. Both father-son relationships in “The Iliad” and “The Odyssey” are the same, but, to the point that the worth of the relationships and the meaning that each father held for each son was determined through distance. While a father being absent did not always make the heart grow loving, it served to give each of these characters the physical and psychological space to consider the true foundation of their relationships with one another and to define themselves.

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