Essay about Analysis Of ' Grendel 's Mother

Essay about Analysis Of ' Grendel 's Mother

Length: 731 words (2.1 double-spaced pages)

Rating: Better Essays

Open Document

Essay Preview

She’s Without a Name
Grendel’s mother was fierce, combative, monster that had to seek revenge on Beowulf for her son’s death. Grendel’s mother was never given a name. She was referred as the other one, “and now this powerful other one arrives, this force for evil “, spoken from the mouth of Beowulf. In this character analysis, I will describe to you Grendel’s mother appearance, her personality, as well as how other characters in the work view or interact with her. Her nasty appearance will be described by the other characters. But her personality will be described off of her actions. Finally, the way other characters view and interact with her will be through her reason for being a part of this epic.
First, Grendel’s mother appearance, “Grendel’s mother, monstrous hell-bride, brooded on her wrongs” stated in the text. She was described as a “swamp-thing from hell, the tarn-hag in all her strength”. The term “tarn” is a small lake. She is a water monster. This monster was strong compared to her son Grendel. She was so strong; she broke the first blade that Beowulf swung upon her head...

Need Writing Help?

Get feedback on grammar, clarity, concision and logic instantly.

Check your paper »

Analysis Of ' Grendel 's Mother From Beowulf, The Wanderer, And Caedmon 's Hymn

- It can be said that there is nothing more permanent than change throughout human history. This notion has prevailed throughout thousands of years as old beliefs and ways of life are replaced by the next logical step in humanity’s attempt to achieve some sensation of sureness or stability in life. Change is at the forefront of much of Old English literature, as the pagan, naturalistic religion of the Anglo-Saxons slowly shifted to Christian ideology. This clash of spiritualistic superiority is clearly illustrated in the episode of Grendel’s Mother from Beowulf, the Wanderer, and Caedmon’s Hymn, all of which display a shift of Anglo-Saxon society to Christianity through a demonization of natur...   [tags: Anglo-Saxons, Beowulf, Christianity, Religion]

Better Essays
849 words (2.4 pages)

Monsters in Beowulf Essay

- There are three prominent monsters in the Beowulf text, Grendel, his mother, and the dragon. While the dragon proves to be the most fatale of foes for Beowulf, Grendel and his mother do not simply pose physical threats to the Germanic society; their roles in Beowulf are manifold. They challenge the perceptions of heroism, a sense of unrivalled perfection and superiority. Moreover, they allow the reader to reconsider the gender constructs upheld within the text; one cannot help but feel that the threat that these monsters present is directed towards the prevalent flaws in Beowulf’s world....   [tags: character analysis, Grendel, mother, dragon]

Better Essays
2103 words (6 pages)

Essay on Beowulf, Grendel, And The Dragon

- Throughout the Old English poem Beowulf, Grendel, Grendel’s mother, and the dragon were better known as the antagonists/monsters. The saying is “beauty is only skin-deep”, but in this case, it was more than their appearances that confirmed the definition of their behaviors. Much has been written on the roles, functions, descriptions, and underlying motivations and sources of the "monsters" presented in Beowulf. With a brief overview of the three, readers will be able to identify the nature of the monsters in the poem and compare their characteristics to the narrative....   [tags: Beowulf, Grendel, Beowulf, Hroðgar]

Better Essays
1438 words (4.1 pages)

Analysis Of Beowulf 's ' Beowulf ' Essay

- Beowulf wants to help Hrothgar because he realizes that despite current rivalries, he has a commitment to serving humankind. He also wants a chance to show off his prowess more people, and wants the admiration.Hrothgar is able to save face because Beowulf comes to him asking permission to slay Grendel. When worded this way, it makes it seems as if the king was the mastermind behind the operation, and was the one who made the decision to have Grendel slain.The number twelve has many religious connotations, including, but not limited to, the twelve days of Christmas, the twelve apostles, and the twelve tribes of Israel....   [tags: Beowulf, Combat, Grendel's mother, ComBat]

Better Essays
1161 words (3.3 pages)

Analysis Of The Poem ' The Buried Treasure ' Essay

- Safa Akhter Beowulf’s Buried Treasure Poetry has an enormous influence on Anglo-Saxon literature. The art of poetry is an important part of Anglo-Saxon culture. The scop, or Anglo-Saxon oral poet, tells stories of behaviors for the tribe to strive for and bring them together. It was also used as a means of keeping the stories of the brave and noble warriors alive for generations to come. Symbols that the scops inserts into poems make them more participatory, because they would help liven up the language....   [tags: Beowulf, Heorot, Hroðgar, Grendel's mother]

Better Essays
1479 words (4.2 pages)

Analysis Of ' Grendel ' By John Gardner Essay

- T.S. Eliot, a poet, playwright, and literary critic, once stated, “People exercise an unconscious selection in being influenced.” Naturally, every experience people have and every person they meet leaves an impact on their lives. Whether positive or negative, outside influences can alter the way one thinks, acts, and even views the world. In John Gardner’s novel, Grendel, Grendel encounters numerous characters who play vital roles in the shaping and development of his overall persona. Though much of Grendel’s time was spent in his cave or spying in the woods, what minimal public contact he actually shared spurred major lasting impressions....   [tags: Life, Meaning of life, John Gardner]

Better Essays
1186 words (3.4 pages)

Grendel: The Outcast Essay

- Archetypes refer to the persistently recurring symbols or motifs in literature. The term itself has its origins in ancient Greek and continues to play a prominent role in analyzing literature. Archetypal images and story patterns encourage readers to participate ritualistically in basic beliefs, fears, and anxieties of their age. These archetypal features not only constitute the eloquence of the text but also tap into a level of desires and concerns of civilization. The Anglo-Saxon poem, Beowulf, translated by Seamus Heaney, integrates many of the common archetypes that still exist today....   [tags: literary analysis, archetypes]

Better Essays
1429 words (4.1 pages)

Analysis Of ' The Novel ' Grendel ' By John Gardner Essay

- Curiosity Kills Various people know that “curiosity killed the cat” but that is not the initial statement. In 1598, during Every Man in His Humour by English playwright Ben Jonson, the expression was first known as “care’ll kill a cat” (1). This phrase doesn’t implicate care as to nurture or tend to, but rather worry or sorrow. The remark “curiosity killed the cat” is commonly used when one wants another to stop asking nonessential questions. Much like the cat in the play, the 1971 novel Grendel by John Gardner, also holds a beast curious about his life and surroundings....   [tags: Human, Meaning of life, Life, Question]

Better Essays
1272 words (3.6 pages)

Grendel Essay

- In 1971, American author John Gardner wrote Grendel. With a mastermind of creativity, John Gardner successfully retells the classic epic poem, Beowulf. He captures the reader by giving an interesting view of order and chaos, good and evil, hero and monster, allowing the monsters point of view to be seen. On July 21, 1933 John Gardner was born in Batavia, New York. He was the son of a preacher and diary, and his mother taught English. They were very fond of Shakespeare and loved to recite literature....   [tags: Literary Analysis, John Garner]

Better Essays
1163 words (3.3 pages)

Essay on Existentialism In Grendel

- Existentialism In Grendel The debate between existentialism and the rest of the world is a fierce, albeit recent one. Before the "dawn of science" and the Age Of Reason, it was universally accepted that there were such things as gods, right and wrong, and heroism. However, with the developing interest in science and the mechanization of the universe near the end of the Renaissance, the need for a God was essentially removed, and humankind was left to reconsider the origin of meaning. John Gardner’s intelligently written Grendel is a commentary on the merits and flaws of both types of worldview: the existentialist "meaning-free" universe, and the heroic universe, where every action is...   [tags: essays papers]

Better Essays
1611 words (4.6 pages)