Analysis Of Emily Bronte 's ' Wuthering Heights ' Essay

Analysis Of Emily Bronte 's ' Wuthering Heights ' Essay

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Emily Bronte’s novel Wuthering Heights tells a passionate story of love that spans across generations and transcends life and death. Heathcliff, a neglected orphan raised by the Earnshaw family at the brooding Wuthering Heights, loses Catherine Earnshaw, his true love, to Edgar Linton, a member of the wealthy Linton family at the elegant Thrushcross Grange. Heathcliff disappears for three years and returns an esteemed man, ready to take revenge on those who wronged him. As time passes these characters birth a new generation whose upbringings are greatly affected by their parents. The novel saw its cinematic rehashing in a PBS film of the same name directed by Coky Giedroyc. The story remains relatively unchanged between both versions, but the film contains a numerous amount of differences that distinguish it significantly from the book. The film lacks depth in certain characters, adds and omits certain events and removes narration entirely. Because of this, the film provides an accurate account of the story but fails to emulate the level of passion that the book contains.
Emily Bronte begins the book without any context behind the history of the odd characters. But she beautifully orchestrates a series of events that give meaning to the characters. The film brings changes to various events from the book that either build on or destroy their significance. The first example is the progression of love between Catherine and Heathcliff. Emily Bronte slowly builds up the tension of love between the two when the story of their youth is being told. This slow build-up is released in passionate glory when Catherine confesses her feelings for Heathcliff to Nelly. She says that she will marry Edgar because marrying Heathcliff would be to d...


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...n excludes many of her insights and rids the audience of useful background knowledge. Without Lockwood and Nelly as narrators, a third person perspective robs the audience of their inner thoughts, which greatly set the tone for the novel.
Although films cannot never perfectly emulate the source material, they are supposed to embody the meaning of them. This adaptation of Emily Bronte’s Wuthering Heights fails to encapsulate the passion that Bronte wove throughout her novel. Complex characters such as Nelly and Hareton are watered down into having simple personas. The events in the book have been changed so significantly that they have lost their meaning, or they have been omitted altogether. The dearth of narrators makes the storytelling less sophisticated and less meaningful. Yet, with all these changes, Wuthering Heights remains a classic--novel or film.










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