Analysis Of Cece Bell 's ' About A Young Girl Who Becomes Deaf ' Essay example

Analysis Of Cece Bell 's ' About A Young Girl Who Becomes Deaf ' Essay example

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CeCe Bell wrote a graphic novel about a young girl who becomes deaf. In this novel, she addresses the issue of differences and disability. Other articles and books that address the same controversy are The for Hearing People Only textbook, the Mastering ASL textbook, and the article Disability and Difference: Balancing Social and Physical Constructions. Disability and difference is a big issue today, the Deaf especially.
The graphic novel is about a young girl (CeCe) who got sick with meningitis and in result of this illness she lost her hearing. She begins the journey of accepting herself as a deaf person and being deaf in her community. She experiences bullying and she is really insecure about herself and the use of her hearing aids. She also was taken advantage a few times. An example of her being taken advantage of because she is deaf is when a boy began talking to her and she told him, her secret that she could hear her teacher everywhere she went. So, when the teacher left the classroom, the boy convinced her to tell the class when the teacher was coming back to the classroom so the class could have a little party. At first, she does not think her “friend” is taking advantage of her being deaf, but then realizes it later on and is not happy about it. CeCe’s mom starts taking her to a local sign language class. Her mom really wanted her to learn it and was kind of pushing her to learn it. However, she makes a scene and she makes her mom understand that she does not want to do American Sign Language. CeCe chooses to not partake in sign language because she believes that people make a fool of themselves when they sign to her and she believes that they act like mimes. Also, everyone would stare at her while she signs or when so...


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...owing it as a difference CeCe becomes a very strong young girl and becomes confident in herself.
CeCe Bells graphic novel does a very good job in explaining that just because CeCe is deaf does not mean that she has a disability. She puts it in a great way for children to understand and shows the audience how CeCe feels as being a deaf person. The four sources; El Deafo, The For Hearing People Only textbook, Mastering ASL textbook, and Tom Koch’s article: Disability and difference: balancing social and physical constructions, all give solid arguments on the topic of disability versus difference. My stance is that I believe that if you are Deaf or deaf you just have a difference. Deaf/deaf people are the same as hearing people they just cannot hear. But, they know how to communicate so there really is no difference to me. They should not be labeled as a disability.


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