Essay on Analysis Of Atwood 's ' Oryx And Crake '

Essay on Analysis Of Atwood 's ' Oryx And Crake '

Length: 1075 words (3.1 double-spaced pages)

Rating: Better Essays

Open Document

Essay Preview

Over the past few decades, society has been ceaselessly advancing in the field of science. From smartphones to genetic modification, humans have been consistently developing new technologies. But how often have we stopped to consider the future implications these technologies can bring? While they generate profit, technology can also unevenly distribute wealth as a result of this profit. In the novel “Oryx and Crake”, Atwood shows the possible economic aftermath of an uncontrolled scientific journey that leads to the downfall of the human race through examples such as genetically modified crops, synthetic diseases, and miracle pills.
On example of scientific advancement in the novel is the genetically modified coffee bean: Happicuppa. Atwood writes: “Until then, the individual coffee beans on each bush had ripened at different times and had needed to be handpicked and processed and shipped in small quantities, but the Happicuppa coffee bush was designed so that all of its beans would ripen simultaneously, and coffee could be grown on huge plantations and harvested with machines” (Atwood 178-179). To maximize profits, the “Happicuppa coffee bush was designed” by a large corporation to possess desired traits. These traits allowed for the beans to “ripen simultaneously” and as a result “could be grown on huge plantations and harvested with machines” for much greater yield. This yield is very profitable, and could transfer wealth into the hands of the corporations. Atwood continues: “This threw the small growers out of business and reduced both them and their labourers to starvation-level poverty” (Atwood 179). The author refers to the other growers as “small growers” to emphasize the difference in wealth between them and the large c...


... middle of paper ...


...uing and incredibly useful, it eventually destroyed the society in which it was developed. Even though scientific advancement can improve living conditions and solve global issues, it can create them as well. As seen through the genetic modification of coffee beans, the creation of profitable diseases, and the development of the BlyssPluss Pill, the profits generated through technology trigger human greed. This greed leads to extreme capitalism that feeds the economic gap of society and puts the world in control of gigantic corporations. The growth of technology is only beneficial up to a certain extent, otherwise it could lead to catastrophic results through misuse. Atwood’s novel can serve as a warning against intense scientific progression. We as a society must heed that warning to control the potentially destructive technology civilization is so eager to create.

Need Writing Help?

Get feedback on grammar, clarity, concision and logic instantly.

Check your paper »

Essay on Analysis Of Atwood 's ' Oryx And Crake '

- Over the past few decades, society has been ceaselessly advancing in the field of science. From smartphones to genetic modification, humans have been consistently developing new technologies. But how often have we stopped to consider the future implications these technologies can bring. While they generate profit, technology can also unevenly distribute wealth as a result of this profit. In the novel “Oryx and Crake”, Atwood shows the possible economic aftermath of an uncontrolled scientific journey that leads to the downfall of the human race through examples such as genetically modified crops, synthetic diseases, and miracle pills....   [tags: Poverty, Human, Coffee, Science fiction]

Better Essays
1075 words (3.1 pages)

Unfolding the Mysterious Character of Oryx Essay

- Why does an author opt for a mysterious character in the novel. The answer to this ultimate question is that he wants the reader to consider himself in the place of the character who is solving the conundrum, or who is narrating the story. In this case, the main character, Snowman, is recalling the tale of a girl whose nature and psyche is difficult to explain. It is difficult, but not impossible to explain due to the reason that the narrator gives some description of her physical attributes and her personality traits....   [tags: Oryx and Crake, Margaret Atwood, Analysis]

Better Essays
1633 words (4.7 pages)

Analysis Of The Underground And Margaret Atwood 's Oryx And Crake Essay

- In Fyodor Dostoevsky’s Notes from the Underground and Margaret Atwood’s Oryx and Crake, discuss the modification of the natural world and human nature. The books come from different perspectives but discuss these same ideas. Notes from the Underground comes from the perspective of a man who is somewhat in hiding in a small corner of a room with a servant in an attempt to escape the outside world of Petersburg, Russia. While Oryx and Crake comes from a boy who is also living on the outskirts of society but travels in an effort to escape the tragedy at home....   [tags: Pain, Suffering, The Handmaid's Tale, Science]

Better Essays
906 words (2.6 pages)

Essay about Margaret Atwood's Oryx and Crake

- The Ending of the Human Race Margaret Atwood’s novel Oryx and Crake is considered to be a world time dystopian masterpiece. Atwood presents an apocalyptic atmosphere through the novel’s antagonist, Crake, and protagonist, Jimmy/Snowman. She does this when Crake uses his scientific knowledge and wickedness to eliminate and recreate an entirely new society. “Future-Technology was envisioned as a way to easing the burden of life, and it was accepted that slavery would remain a tacit part of human existence until there would be some effective replacement for it, for until the shuttle would weave and the plectrum touch the lyre without a hand to guide them (bk.1, pt.4), there would be a need for...   [tags: novel, literary analysis]

Better Essays
1284 words (3.7 pages)

Mistreatment for Destruction: The Neglect of Family in Oryx and Crake Essay

- In a normal functioning family, both parent and child care for and love one another, and display these feelings. A parent is required to nurture his or her child and assure that the child feels loved by spending time together, and by giving the child sufficient attention. However, there are often times when a parent is unable to fulfill these requirements, which can ultimately have damaging effects on the child. A child who is neglected by his or her parents “perceives the world as a hostile and uncaring place....   [tags: Margaret Atwood, character analysis]

Better Essays
1279 words (3.7 pages)

Self Discovery in Margaret Atwood’s Oryx and Crake Essay

- How does one go about discovering the veiled mysteries of oneself. First and foremost, what is the self. The self is who we are as an individual. It is the ethics, beliefs, values, opinions, thoughts, actions and everything that one does. Knowing oneself is also knowing what one desires out of life, ones goals and aspirations. External appearances have very little to do with the self. “Oryx and Crake” is a novel by Margaret Atwood that demonstrates how certain intriguing, distinctive characters develop themselves....   [tags: Oryx and Crake]

Better Essays
2269 words (6.5 pages)

Understanding Vs. Knowing in Atwood’s Oryx and Crake Essay

- It is often simpler to settle for an understanding of the world and people around us instead of trying to know the truth. Truth has consequences; by knowing too much, one can lose a friend, learn a deadly secret, or become someone they do not want to be. To express his understanding of himself and the world around him, Crake in Oryx and Crake uses quote-bearing fridge magnets. One very important quote is “We understand more than we know”. It is important to recognize the difference between the terms "understand" and "know"; the Oxford English Dictionary defines "to understand" as to perceive the significance, explanation, or cause of, whereas "to know" is to be absolutely certain or sure abo...   [tags: Literary Analysis ]

Better Essays
2437 words (7 pages)

Jimmy is a Justifiable Jerk: The Question of Love in Atwood’s Oryx and Crake

- “ ‘You can’t buy it, but it has a price,’ said Oryx. ‘Everything has a price’ ” (Atwood 138). If everything has a price then everything is a product and if something is a product, it is made to be used in some shape or form. What of love though. Does love follow under the category of something. In Margaret Atwood’s novel Oryx and Crake, Jimmy, the protagonist, hints at the idea that love cannot be bought in his discussion with Oryx. How ironic this idea is for Jimmy to consider when the reader considers Jimmy’s use of love....   [tags: literary and character analysis]

Better Essays
1929 words (5.5 pages)

Margaret Atwood’s Oryx and Crake Essays

- In a world dominated by religion it was thought that the only place where perfection existed was within God. In some cases, for instance the ontological argument, it was the proof to his existence. But in a modern world the concept of perfection has been distorted and comes with an abundance of seemingly negative consequences, ultimately putting into question whether or not perfection is even possible. In Margaret Atwood’s Oryx and Crake the concept of perfection is constantly challenged in a world run by corporations who are trying to package human perfection and profit from it....   [tags: oryx and crake, margaret atwood ]

Better Essays
1939 words (5.5 pages)

Oryx and Crake by Margaret Atwood Essay

- Oryx and Crake by Margaret Atwood As I first started to read ‘Oryx and Crake’, I was somewhat skeptical of whether or not I would enjoy reading it. The first chapter confused me with unusual words that I have never heard or seen before. Whenever I read something it is usually a book or magazine that I plan on reading or that is based on actual facts on a certain subject such as history or sports related. This book came as a surprise as I started to read it because it was not as hard to understand as I thought it would be and was actually quite enjoyable....   [tags: Atwood Oryx Crake Book Review]

Better Essays
1263 words (3.6 pages)