An Analysis of Mary Shelly's Frankenstein Essay

An Analysis of Mary Shelly's Frankenstein Essay

Length: 1197 words (3.4 double-spaced pages)

Rating: Strong Essays

Open Document

Essay Preview

Mary Shelly wrote Frankenstein in a time of wonder. A main wonder was whether you could put life back into the dead. Close to the topic of bringing life back into the dead was whether you could create your own being, like selective breeding however with more power. Perhaps she chose to write this story opposing to one of a Ghost as she felt it was more relevant to her era and wanted to voice her own opinions and concerns to what the future may hold.

Playing God, pinching corpses, pretention is this a morally justified thing to do?
These are all traits of Victor Frankenstein. Was this morally right for a Georgian man?
Would this even be right for a modern day man? What was Mary Shelley trying to say?
What was the “monster” like and was he really born evil?
These are all questions to be explored as well as many others.

In the 1700’s things were very different to life today; this included the medicine of the time. The idea of medicine came from the Greeks and they came up with the four humours (consisting of water, fire, air and earth.) By the 1840’s most anaesthetics were accepted as James Simpson presented a powerful case for them; however they didn’t make surgery safer and the amount of people dying from operations increased. The final breakthrough for anaesthetics was when Queen Victoria accepted the use of Chloroform during the delivery of her eighth child. Even though being anesthetised was less painful surgeons did not take any precautions to protect open wounds and infections were spread by the reuse of old bandages!
Since the sixteenth century medicine has progressed further and it will continue to do so until...maybe when a miscreated ‘monster’ is born. We can now perform acutely complex operations and offer surg...


... middle of paper ...


...ds) and a bit mad, he says repetitively how beautiful the ‘monster’ is going to be but as soon as he is alive he becomes some hideous creature to him that should never have been born and therefore he must shun him. The way he narrates the story it is that he is angelic and justified for his actions and the monster (his creation) is benevolent and a disgrace!

Mary Shelley’s message has something to do with today as there is all this talk that we have the science to bring back the dinosaurs and make our perfect disease free babies! But do we really need clones and all this risk in our lives. I think this is the kind of thing she was trying to suggest and warn us of before we get too carried away. And to be honest I think we are better off without some of the technology we have available today and I don’t think it will stop until something goes terribly wrong!

Need Writing Help?

Get feedback on grammar, clarity, concision and logic instantly.

Check your paper »

An Analysis of Mary Shelly's Frankenstein Essay

- Mary Shelly wrote Frankenstein in a time of wonder. A main wonder was whether you could put life back into the dead. Close to the topic of bringing life back into the dead was whether you could create your own being, like selective breeding however with more power. Perhaps she chose to write this story opposing to one of a Ghost as she felt it was more relevant to her era and wanted to voice her own opinions and concerns to what the future may hold. Playing God, pinching corpses, pretention is this a morally justified thing to do....   [tags: English Literature, Literary Criticism]

Strong Essays
1197 words (3.4 pages)

Essay on Analysis Of Mary Shelly 's ' Frankenstein '

- Frankenstein by Mary Shelly the novel starts of on a ship heading for the North Pole with a captain Walton writing letter to his sister back in England. Writing to her about all the process of this danger mission for science journey hoping to make important scientific discovers. As he writes his letters to his sister he waits for this sheet of ice surrounding his ship to be weak enough to break. Then as he looks out the window he see a gigantic man driving a dog sledding across the ice. Then after the abstaining sight they later see a normal average man on a dog sledge expect this man is exhausted and half dyed....   [tags: English-language films, Black-and-white films]

Strong Essays
1068 words (3.1 pages)

Analysis Of Mary Shelly 's Frankenstein Essay

- Through studies, getting rejected from the society and not measuring up to society’s norms of aesthetic are some key roots of aggressive and violent behavior. In Mary Shelly’s Frankenstein, the creatures desire to get accepted into society as well as fit into the society’s standards of beauty led to “his” monstrous demeanor. In many cases of school shootings, most students were facing social rejection. Furthermore, people in our society try extremely to fit into our immutable society. As seen in the novel, school shootings, and the people of today, there is a link between getting accepted in society and meeting the standards of attractiveness to aggressive and cruel actions....   [tags: Aggression, Social rejection]

Strong Essays
972 words (2.8 pages)

The Pursuit of Technology in Mary Shelly's "Frankenstein". Essay

- The Industrial Revolution of the late eighteenth, and early nineteenth century created a significant advance in technology. Mary Shelly’s life and literature were influenced by this technological turning point. Thirst of knowledge is a dominant theme in Mary Shelly’s “Frankenstein”, and the driving force behind continuous technological developments. Human Beings are completely dependent on Modern technology and it would be difficult to survive without it. Artificial Intelligence (AI) is a growing reality....   [tags: Literary Analysis ]

Strong Essays
1963 words (5.6 pages)

Mary Shelly's Frankenstein Essay

- Ever since the inception of humanity, individuals have had the overwhelming desire to explore the unknown and to overstep the boundaries of their intellectual capacity. With the establishment of civilization, the acquisition of knowledge became an even more powerful driving force as periods of history such as the Age of Exploration and the Scientific Revolution reflected the realization that knowledge has the power to not only benefit the individual but also to society. Today, this same old adage resonates ever so deeply within modern society....   [tags: Humanity, Analysis]

Strong Essays
1235 words (3.5 pages)

Mary Shelly's Gothic Novel Frankenstein Essays

- Mary Wollstonecraft Shelly was born in London in 1797. She was the daughter of William Godwin, who was a political philosopher, and Mary Wollstonecraft, who also was a philosopher and a feminist. Mary’s mother sadly died shortly after giving birth to her, and Mary and half sister Fanny, soon gained a stepsister, Claire, when her father remarried Mary Jane Clairmont. Around 1814 Mary met Percy Bysshe Shelly, who was a Romantic poet and philosopher. They both fell in love; however Shelly was actually unhappily married to Harriet Westbrook at this time....   [tags: Literary Analysis ]

Strong Essays
2659 words (7.6 pages)

The Overactive Imagination in Mary Shelly’s Frankenstein Essay

- In an influential event in Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, a young servant, Justine, of the Frankenstein family is on trial for the death of the youngest son, William Frankenstein. She claims to not have murdered this young boy, for she cares for him greatly as if he is her own on the account of the cousin of the Frankenstein’s, Elizabeth. The Frankenstein family is attending Justine’s trial and Victor Frankenstein believes that Justine is innocent. Also, that it is the monster that he is creating who kills his youngest brother....   [tags: literary analysis, classic literature]

Strong Essays
1042 words (3 pages)

Human Relationships-Frankenstein Essay

- Mary Shelly’s Frankenstein is book about the importance of human relationships and treating everyone with dignity and respect. The main character of the book is Victor Frankenstein who is a very intelligent man with a desire to create life in another being. After he completes his creation, he is horrified to find that what he has created is a monster. The monster is the ugliest, most disgusting creature that he has ever seen. Victor being sickened by his creation allows the monster to run off and become all alone in the world....   [tags: Literary Analysis, Mary Shelly]

Strong Essays
1907 words (5.4 pages)

Victor Frankenstein Essay

- Question #7- What difficult circumstances is Walton encountering when he meets Victor Frankenstein. In the letters that Robert Walton sent to his sisters, there is legit evidence that he was encountering difficult circumstances when he met Victor Frankenstein. When Walton's vessel was sailing to the Northern Pole they encountered heavy fog and lots of ice. Walton's exact words were, "...we were nearly surrounded by ice" (8). and he also exclaimed, "...we were compassed round by a very thick fog" (8)....   [tags: Literary Analysis, Mary Shelly]

Strong Essays
1753 words (5 pages)

Analysis Of Mary Shelley 's ' Frankenstein ' Essay

- In Mary Shelley’s novel, “Frankenstein”, the thematic of suffering is introduced again and again throughout the work. Through the protagonist Victor Frankenstein and his creation, Shelley was able to explore the relationship between suffering and education and suffering and the human consciousness. The development between the two characters makes us question whether or not one can truly understand another’s suffering and how it can affect our morals. In this analysis, we will address these issues in order to gain a deeper understanding of the role of suffering in the novel....   [tags: Frankenstein, Mary Shelley, Paradise Lost]

Strong Essays
1336 words (3.8 pages)