An Analysis of Important Motifs in Sound and Editing Essay

An Analysis of Important Motifs in Sound and Editing Essay

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Sound and editing are both very crucial concepts in film. In Tom Tykwer's Run Lola Run (1998), the way the narrative structure is set up can make the differentiation of diegetic and non-diegetic sound difficult for the viewer. The relationship between sound and the narrative structure, however, also makes the viewer more aware of the film's artificiality. In King Hu's Come Drink With Me (1966), we see how the major motifs of editing emphasize the unrealistic and fantasy qualities of the characters.
Tom Tykwer's Run Lola Run is a change in the structure of narrative as we commonly see it. A standard narrative consists of a beginning-where there is a sense of normality, a disruption of that normality that transitions into the middle, and then the end, where the problem is resolved and there is a return to normal. In Run Lola Run, however, the sense of normality is thrown out the window in the very beginning of the story. The viewer is immediately thrown into chaos as they listen to the frantic conversation between Lola and her boyfriend, Manni. Manni is a small-time criminal who has lost 100,000 marks that need to be given to his boss by noon. Lola promises that she will find the money for him, and this is where the protagonist, Lola, sets out to find a solution to the problem at hand. At this point, the narrative is still rather simple, and it continues, as we would expect; Lola gets off the phone to Manni and immediately goes in search of 100,000 marks. She goes to her father asking him for the money, only to be turned down. Although she has not been able to get the money from her father, the viewer's expectations are for her and Manni to succeed, which we assume will happen when they hold up the supermarket. The expectation of...


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...nni. Realistically, it would be extremely difficult to have a conversation at normal level through glass, and Tykwer emphasizes the important sounds of the film. Another great example is in the second part, when Lola send the teller downstairs to get the rest of the money, since he only has 88,000 above. During this time, the only thing we hear is the elevator and he travels down, and the clunk of the money as he drops it into the trash bag. In the second part we also hear clicking as Lola turns the safety off as she threatens her father. This is relevant because in the first part when Lola is helping Manni rob the store, he has to tell her how to turn it off; Tykwer makes it appear as if Lola learned from the first scenario.
Come Drink With Me also has an unrealistic quality to it, though it deals with the characters themselves rather than the film as a whole.

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