American Women's History Essay

American Women's History Essay

Length: 1308 words (3.7 double-spaced pages)

Rating: Strong Essays

Open Document

Essay Preview

1. The American Revolution impacted almost every aspect of Native American, European American, and African American women's lives.
The American Revolution severely affected Native American women, especially agriculturally. They were the farmers and gardeners of their tribes and the war damaged the soil so much so in some areas that farming was rendered impossible. Most Native Americans, including the women, sided with Britain during the war. Each tribal woman grew crops, when possible, for the British soldiers as well. Further, the American Revolution significantly affected trading between Native Americans and the white men. Because women were heads of trading, the lack thereof made it nearly impossible for them to maintain their standard of living. The one thing that did not change as a result of the American Revolution is racism. Before, during, and after, most white men continued to view Native American Women as secondary citizens. Also, Native Americans as a whole were being displaced from their homes. The revolution was enormously destructive for Native American women.
Secondly, the American Revolution impacted every aspect of European American women's lives. Although they were not yet formally recognized in politics during that time, their lives still changed tremendously as they faced a revolution which encompassed social, domestic, and political issues. While their husbands were off to war, American women continued to take care of their homes and families while taking on much of the “men's work” as well, including looking after the farms. The men who were lucky enough to return home from the war came back mangled with severe injuries and illnesses. “Some women managed to address their loneliness and anxi...


... middle of paper ...


... that “the history of mankind is a history of repeated injuries and usurpations on the part of man towards women, having in direct object the establishment of an absolute tyranny over her” (Block, Alexander, Norton, 142). The Declaration included several solutions to providing women a bigger proportion in society and tools to break away from the tyranny of their husbands. The Declaration was signed by 100 people at the convention and became enormously influential in spreading the ideas of the suffrage movement across the nation. Some say the Seneca Falls convention was the beginning of the women's rights movement, however, the movement had been well on its way since the beginning of the American Revolution.


Works Cited

Block, Sharon, Ruth M. Alexander, and Mary Beth Norton. Major Problems in American Women's History. 5th ed. N.p.: Wadsworth Pub, 2013. Print.

Need Writing Help?

Get feedback on grammar, clarity, concision and logic instantly.

Check your paper »

Women During Early American History Essay

- Our Nation’s history is defined by the bravery of the men and women who make up our country. While it may seem more common to hear stories of men going into battle, or winning an election, women have played a extremely important role as well, whether that be behind the scenes or otherwise. In every history course I’ve taken, I’d learn about the bravery of these men and how the women would “do their part” by staying home to raise kids, make clothes or food, and to manage the home. What’s interesting is that the women working behind the scenes were just as helpful in moving our country forward as men have been....   [tags: Women's suffrage, Elizabeth Cady Stanton]

Strong Essays
1239 words (3.5 pages)

American Women's History Essay

- 1. The American Revolution impacted almost every aspect of Native American, European American, and African American women's lives. The American Revolution severely affected Native American women, especially agriculturally. They were the farmers and gardeners of their tribes and the war damaged the soil so much so in some areas that farming was rendered impossible. Most Native Americans, including the women, sided with Britain during the war. Each tribal woman grew crops, when possible, for the British soldiers as well....   [tags: american revolution, racism]

Strong Essays
1308 words (3.7 pages)

Role of Women in Early Republic Essay

- The role of women in the Early Republic is a topic mostly overlooked by historians when dealing with this era of American history. The triumphs of the Revolution and the early events of the new nation were done solely by men. However, women had their own political societies and even participated in the Revolution. Women's roles began to take a major turn after the war with Great Britain. This was due in part to their involvement in the war and female patriotism. Others believed it was due to the easier access to formal education for young women....   [tags: Historians, American History, Women]

Strong Essays
1773 words (5.1 pages)

Women's Suffrage in American History Essay

- ... Lucy Stone portrays female dominance by going against the law to earn women's rights. Lucy was hired at AERA, but her speech in 1850 converted Susan B. Anthony to the suffrage cause, later split with Anthony over strategy and tactics, splitting the suffrage movement into two major branches. She continued to be an editor for the Woman's Journal. Lucy Stone's radical move to keep her own name continued to inspire, she is still remembered, today, as the first woman to keep her own name after marriage....   [tags: change, right to vote]

Strong Essays
680 words (1.9 pages)

Essay on Women of Early American History

- Women of Early American History We find many story’s recounting the contributions men made throughout American history; yet, in comparison we find few accounts of women’s influence and patriotism for their county. This does not mean that women did not contribute to the establishing and building of a new government. There are some accounts of women who through voicing their opinions or through their actions made a difference. Abigail Adams spoke to her husband about her concerns for America and the future state of women in a new government, Emily Geiger performed a heroic deed for her country, and Maria Stewart voiced her feelings regarding freedom for blacks....   [tags: Amy Geiger, Abigail Adams, Maria Stewart]

Strong Essays
1477 words (4.2 pages)

Women Of American History Have Impacted Our Lives Today Essay

- Women in American history have impacted our lives today significantly. Before the early 1800’s the female role had the essential features of man’s wife, and vaguely elaborate the daily life of a female of those times. Up until the middle 1800’s there were no movements to pursue rights for women in America. 1848, the first rights convention was held. A two-day debate in Seneca Falls NY. The conclusion of this event came to sixty-eight women and thirty-two men signing the Declaration of Sentiments and Resolutions, a document drafted by Elizabeth Candy Stanton....   [tags: Women's suffrage, Women's rights]

Strong Essays
1492 words (4.3 pages)

Women Throughout American History Essay example

- Women have not always been able to voice there opinions or work in the same position as men. Women have always been looked upon as mothers that work in the home and care for the family and do nothing more than that. Although there is nothing wrong with that (some women are perfectly happy with this role) that perception of the women has limited us and hasn’t let us reach our full potential. The image of the woman has drastically changed. Until only fifty years ago or so, women had to "behave nice" to men in order to be selected by men and supported by them because for thousands of years societies have prohibited women from becoming self-sufficient....   [tags: Suffrage, Equality]

Strong Essays
588 words (1.7 pages)

Essay about Comparison of Three Prominent Women in American History (1616-1768)

- ... Anne Hutchinson was a seventeenth century women who used her voice freely and forcefully, as a result political maneuvering by the council destroyed her. Which this would lead the Antinomian Controversy. This controversy made Hutchinson famous in the unfolding in the Massachusetts Bay Colony from 1636 to 1638, which the council was deeply satisfied with the teachings of several church leaders; begin to publicly express their discontent. “Hutchinson and others argued that preachers were promoting a covenant of works rather than a covenant of grace, wrongly communicating the idea that an indivual could be saved by obedience and duty rather than solely by redeeming grace of the holy sprit”....   [tags: pocahontas, hutchinson, griffitts]

Strong Essays
1530 words (4.4 pages)

Essay about Contributions of Women Abolitionists

- The Abolitionist Movement transformed the role of women in American History. Prior to the abolitionist movement, women were viewed as invisible icons in society. A typical woman would only be responsible for motherhood duties, cleaning, and preparing food. While many women agreed with this, others did not. The desire to be heard and treated equally was something numerous women shared. Astonishing women like, Sojourner Truth, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, and Grimke sisters became prominent leaders in the abolitionist movement and made a pathway in history by initiating speeches, participating in female politics and supporting their personal opinions of women’s rights through religious doctrines....   [tags: the role of women in American History]

Strong Essays
783 words (2.2 pages)

Essay on Women Needs Not Apply : A History Of The American Nurse

- “A nurse is never too tired, nor too sick, nor too cold, nor too hungry,” was once said by a nurse in by a nurse in the film, “Sentimental Women Need Not Apply: A History of the American Nurse.” Nursing was just starting off at that time; it has grown greatly and is a consistently growing discipline as well as the struggle to truly understand what nursing is. The disciple of human science was created by German philosopher Wilhelm Dilthey, who defines the concept as capturing human beings, their experiences as the source of knowledge, and the everyday lived reality of individuals (Butts 2010)....   [tags: Nursing, Human, Nurse, Nursing practice]

Strong Essays
1110 words (3.2 pages)