The American Perception Of A Disease Essay

The American Perception Of A Disease Essay

Length: 1350 words (3.9 double-spaced pages)

Rating: Strong Essays

Open Document

Essay Preview

The American perception of a disease varies based on domestic presence; treatment by society, especially the media; and the intensity of physically-manifested symptoms as shown by Ebola, HIV/AIDS, and polio. These three factors, although not the only factors that affect reaction to a disease or disease outbreak, are the three most influential and prominent variables. In Ebola, sparse physical domestic presence, sensationalist pop culture, and macabre symptoms worked together to create a divided reaction among the American people: either panic or apathy. In HIV/AIDS, varied domestic infection and divided media representation led to two different reaction depending on one’s race, sexuality, or religion: In unaffected populations, HIV/AIDS was met with prejudice and stigma, whereas affected populations viewed HIV/AIDS with fear. Also, the “invisible” symptom of HIV/AIDS, immunosuppression, worked to perpetuate fear. Contrary to the fear that surrounded the aforementioned disease, the American people reacted to polio with fear, but a motivating fear that unified people across many demographics to fight the American polio epidemic. Polio’s wide-reaching spread, both in numbers and in affected demographics, instilled a sense of urgency that stemmed from the fear that anyone could be affected, while the National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis carved itself a prominent role in American media and culture, encouraging American to react with not fear, but a motivation to help the foundation and eradicate polio.
Because of the lack of serious, widespread infection in the U.S., the role of diseases such as Ebola in modern American pop culture, and the gruesome nature of its symptoms, American reacted the Ebola outbreak of 2014 with mixed ...


... middle of paper ...


...ting a response that promoted suppression or renunciation of those behaviors thought to bring down divine wrath”. Catholic churches also discouraged the use of condoms, putting exposed members at a higher risk of infection. This opinion towards HIV/AIDS led to fear of moral rejection from those at risk and feelings of resentment or disgust towards those infected with HIV/AIDS. Among African-American populations, HIV/AIDS was a political platform to push for government intervention in health and sex education. Drug addicts merely saw it as a result of drug use, a matter that was “personal, rather than political or spiritual”. The heterosexual white population, the American majority, remained largely unaffected, so members of this demographic often stereotyped the disease as occurring only in gay males because of the lack of knowledge and experience with the disease.

Need Writing Help?

Get feedback on grammar, clarity, concision and logic instantly.

Check your paper »

Alzheimer 's Disease And The Disease Of The United States Essay

- ... (Alzheimer 's Foundation of America, 2014; Alzheimer 's Association, 2014). Alzheimer disease is considered one of the biggest health care issues in the US and cost the nation more than 200 billion annually. With a rating of 1 in 3 seniors dies early because of Alzheimer, it 's considered one of highest death causing disease in the states. In addition to the cost of treatments and health care, millions of dollars go to researching the causes and the symptoms. Recording to the latest researches the cause of Alzheimer’s disease is amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles that occur in the brain....   [tags: Alzheimer's disease, Dementia, Neurology]

Strong Essays
720 words (2.1 pages)

Alzheimer 's Disease Of The United States Essay

- ... (Alzheimer 's Foundation of America, 2014; Alzheimer 's Association, 2014). It is considered one of the biggest health care issues in the US and costs the nation more than 200 billion annually. With a rating of 1 in 3 seniors dies early because of Alzheimer, it 's considered one of the highest death causing disease in the states. In addition to the cost of treatments and health care, millions of dollars go to researching the causes and the symptoms. Recording to the latest researches the cause of Alzheimer’s disease is amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles that occur in the brain....   [tags: Alzheimer's disease, Dementia, Neurology]

Strong Essays
725 words (2.1 pages)

Alzheimer 's Disease And Its Effects Essay

- Our world is full of modern medicine and major medical advancements, unfortunately there are many diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD) that baffle some of the great scientist. Alzheimer’s Disease is a neurodegenerative disorder that attacks the cerebral cortex of the brain and gradually progresses with time. People with Alzheimer’s disease have impaired abilities due to the destruction of nerve cells in the brain (American Occupational Therapy Association, 2011). Alzheimer’s disease “results in progressive memory loss, impaired thinking, disorientation, and changes in personality and mood, that leads in advanced cases to a profound decline in cognitive and physical functioning” (Merriam...   [tags: Alzheimer's disease, Neuron, Brain, Acetylcholine]

Strong Essays
1031 words (2.9 pages)

Diagnosis And Portrayal Of Alzheimer 's Disease Essay

- ... She panics because she does not know who he is and has to be sedated to calm down. The disorder affects her relationship with her husband and her children because she cannot recognize them and that makes it tough on them and her as well. Hamilton receives no treatment for her illness because there isn’t one available, but has a caregiver to watch over her at all times. Noah usually visits her and tells her the story again and she regains her memory for a quick second before she relapses and forgets everything again....   [tags: Alzheimer's disease, Traumatic brain injury]

Strong Essays
739 words (2.1 pages)

Concept Analysis on Self Perception Essay

- This is a concept analysis on self-perception. Self-perception is non-discriminatory in that it crosses all socio-economic, religious and ethnic backgrounds. The effects of self-perception can be and usually are life altering. Self-perception can tear at the fabric of the victim's self-confidence, self-worth and trust in their perceptions when relating to life events, eventually causing a chasm or warped view of the inner self. The reason for examining self-perception relates to how it affects the healing process and the relationships with those providing care....   [tags: Psychology]

Strong Essays
1072 words (3.1 pages)

How Obesity Became An Epidemic Disease Essay

- ... If one was to medically link weight to mortality then, these should be categorized as healthier weights than the so called healthy weights as outlined by the BMI scale. Campos attributes this false linkage between health and obesity to society’s obsession to thinness. In “The nation’s childhood obesity epidemic: Health disparities in the making” Suzanne Bennett Johnson claims that obesity is a epidemic disease in dire need of attention. She states a simple statistic that claims that obesity ifs the number one killer in America and then proceed to analyze reasons this problem could have arisen....   [tags: Obesity, Nutrition, Cancer, Epidemiology]

Strong Essays
827 words (2.4 pages)

Essay on Public Perception Of The Media

- In a recent article published by the American Society for Cell Biology, scientist Aliyah Weinstein (2014) argues that the public perception of the contemporary scientist has “spilled over into the practice of science in the laboratory and the focus of research that is performed”. According to Weinstein (2014), these perceptions have largely been informed by the media. Something Weinstein did not include in her article, however, was the extent to which she felt public perception has made an impact on the contemporary scientist and his laboratory -- and how much of a role the media plays in the establishment of this perception....   [tags: Scientific method, Research, Tuskegee, Alabama]

Strong Essays
1092 words (3.1 pages)

HIV African American Essay

- HIV infections in African American Males have been a national growing problem since the early 1990’s. According to CDC, In the United States, there are more than 1 million people living with HIV. 48 percent are afro American males. It estimate that around 1 million people in the United States will be diagnose with HIV in the up coming year with the lifetime risk of becoming infected is 1 in 16 for black males (CDC,2007). There is growing concern about the disproportionate increase of HIV among afro American males ages 13-19 with low social- economic demographics ( )....   [tags: Disease]

Strong Essays
2349 words (6.7 pages)

Essay about Native American Repartition

- Tensions between science and religion have recurred throughout history. The issues of what to do with the remains of our ancestors are viewed differently by people. Some people believe that the burial site should be left untouched. Among this group of people fall the Native Americans. Archaeologists, on the other hand, think we should uncover the burial site to be able to discover more about the history of the land from which the grave lies. The Native American Grave Protection and Repatriation Act was signed into law on November 1990 by President George Bush....   [tags: Native American History]

Free Essays
1574 words (4.5 pages)

Huntingtons Disease Essay

- Huntington's Disease Huntington's disease, also known as Huntington's chorea is a genetic disorder that usually shows up in someone in their thirties and forties, destroys the mind and body and leads to insanity and death within ten to twenty years. The disease works by degenerating the ganglia (a pair of nerve clusters deep in the brain that controls movement, thought, perception, and memory) and cortex by using energy incorrectly. The brain will starve the neurons (brain cells), and sometimes make them work harder than usual, causing extreme mental stress....   [tags: essays research papers]

Strong Essays
1077 words (3.1 pages)