Essay on The American Of The Harlem Renaissance

Essay on The American Of The Harlem Renaissance

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Born in Joplin, Missouri Langston Hughes quickly became the most popular and versatile of the many writers who were within the Harlem Renaissance. Raised by his mother and grandmother, because his father moved to Mexico to get away from racism. Hughes finished high school and immediately started writing poetry. He chose to focus his work on modern, and urban black life. With influences from Walt Whitman Majority of Hughes’s poems portrayed similar themes such as racism, The American Dream, wisdom, aspiration, dignity, self-Actualization, realism, and modernism, that all had to do with black life from the twenties through the sixties. He wanted to show the difference between personal experience and common experience of African Americans Although white American poets inspired some of his work, Hughes’s poems challenged that African Americans be noticed as owners of the culture that they brought to the United States and as fully enfranchised American citizens. Hughes had a lot in common with the realist style of writing that could be found in some of the most popular slave narratives of the nineteenth century; while he had a lot of things in common with their writings there were some differences as well. Hughes wrote about issues that he faced and dealt with on a regular basis, which is more in tune with the precepts of thought that governed realism. Much of Hughes’s work such as “The Negro Speaks of Rivers”, “Mulatto”, “Themes for English B”, “I, Too”, and “Mother to Son” does have the mark of realism in a way that it questions the equality and freedom of African Americans, and how they faced issues and a regular basis.
The poem, “The Negro Speaks of Rivers,” speaks on tradition and experience: “Thematically the poem speaks of conne...


... middle of paper ...


... hardships of making it to the top “It’s had tacks in it, And splinters, And boards torn up, And places with no carpet floor---Bare.” Hughes uses these to show the reader that the mother has had her hardships but she has not given up. The mother in the poem discussing with her son how he cannot give up just as she has not portrays realism because it shows how Hughes was more than likely told by his grandmother who raised him or by his mother that he could not give on life just as they had not; Hughes then uses another metaphor: “Don’t you set down on the steps ‘Cause you finds it’s kinder hard.” Meaning not give up now because it will be harder to get back up and keep going. This symbolizes realism in a way that the mother is acts on the idea the son has to give up, instead she tells him that he’d better not give up “set down on the steps” and to keep striving.





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