Essay about America 's Idols By Harper Lee

Essay about America 's Idols By Harper Lee

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Jason Teh
Mr. Lander
9th Grade La Pd6
11 December 2014
America’s Idols
What does it mean to be a good parent? The most common definition of a good parent is one who makes their children feel valued and loved, by teaching them the difference between right and wrong. At the end of the day, the most essential thing is to create a nurturing environment where your children feel like they can mature into confident, independent, and caring adults. Harper Lee’s novel To Kill A Mockingbird defines what a true parent really is thought hardships and struggles throughout the book. The story is set in the Depression era of a little town in southern Alabama that is struggling with thick prejudice on a colored rape case. The story is told through a character named Scout. Scout and her brother Jem are both beginning to grow up and realize the devastating prejudices among Maycomb. Their father Atticus, who is the lawyer of a colored man’s case, plays the role of the main protagonist who fights through Maycomb’s dark prejudice. He guides Jem and Scout through different types of conflicts by teaching them valuable life lessons. At the Same time, Aunt Alexandra, who is Atticus’s sister wants Jem and scout to mature as an adult based on her views. Together, with the wisdom Atticus’s words, actions and thoughts, has made him into a wise courageous aspiring parent.
Atticus is compassionate towards himself and his children, by showing his wisdom and his unique parenting style through tough conflicts and decisions through the book. An example of his compassionate would be Atticus’s selflessness. For instance, Atticus Finch had risked his own reputation in order to defend Tom Robinson who is a black man accused of raping and beating a white girl. Atticu...


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...t demonstrated their love and respect for Atticus throughout the novel and had gradually matured with Atticus’s life lessons. Atticus has taught his children, independence and tolerance into the right direction without controlling their lives in different types of situations. Although, Atticus wants his children to feel like they can make their own decisions about things, Aunt Alexandra wants to control them and make them have the same beliefs as herself. Both Aunt Alexandra and Atticus want the best out of Jem and scout. Overall, Aunt Alexandra did not fulfill the motherly spot and instead, became the stricter parent of the Finch family. However, Atticus possesses a more greatly effective parenting style. Sadly, there are not a lot of fathers like Atticus in reality.

Bibliographic Citation
Lee, Harper. To Kill a Mockingbird. Philadelphia: Lippincott, 1960. Print.

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