Amendments that Make U.S. Citizens Equal Essay

Amendments that Make U.S. Citizens Equal Essay

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Wouldn’t it be wrong if the women in the United States could not vote? Aren’t elections about coming together as equal United States citizens to vote for a candidate? The 19th amendment of the US Constitution states, “All US female citizens have the right to vote”. Men and women were not treated as equal Americans. The 19th amendment gave women the same rights as men. The 15th amendment of the US Constitution states, “ The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any state on account of race, color, or previous condition of servitude.” Freedom and equal right amendments are important because they represent what America stands for and that’s a free country. This reminds us that we as citizens should participate in any election, not because I say so, simply because not all American citizens were able to vote at a point in time and fought so that you could today.

The 19th amendment was passed by Congress on June, 4 1919 but wasn’t ratified until August, 18 1920. The 19th amendment of the US Constitution states, “All US female citizens have the right to vote”. Men and women were not treated as equal Americans. Many women were only considered housewives at the time. Men wanted women to stay home and take care of the children while the men would bring in the income. It was expected of women like it was traditional. But like all humans you have the ones who will stand up and fight for a change. Women wanted to be educated and were willing to work and make their own decisions. Some women protested, went on hunger strikes, and even jailed fighting for their rights. Women started conventions, groups, anything that could help fight for some equal rights.

The 19th...


... middle of paper ...


...n Luther King would make sure there was equal rights for all United States Americans.

Overall, The 19th amendment of the US Constitution states, “All US female citizens have the right to vote”. Men and women were not treated as equal Americans. The 19th amendment gave women the same rights as men. The 15th amendment of the US Constitution states, “ The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any state on account of race, color, or previous condition of servitude.” Freedom and equal right amendments are important because they represent what America stands for and that’s a free country. This reminds us that we as citizens should participate in any election, not because I say so, simply because not all American citizens were able to vote at a point in time and fought so that you could today.



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