The Amendment Of The United States Constitution Essay

The Amendment Of The United States Constitution Essay

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Gun Control
The 2nd Amendment of the United States Constitution states, “A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed.” ("The Bill of Rights: A Transcription.") Considering this Amendment was ratified in December of 1791, this has been one of the longest laws in the United States. This amendment has been the debate of many political leaders and fellow Americans for years. There are some people who believe that by abolishing or putting regulations on this law that Americans would be and are safer from each other.
While looking in depth on what the 2nd amendment means, there seems to be quite a bit of confusion surrounding the words that are stated. While most Americans view it as a right to own guns, it does not state that the government can’t regulate gun laws. Paul Barrett of the New York Times who wrote an article called Gun Control and the Constitution: Should We Amend the Second Amendment? quoted John Paul Stevens, who is a former member of the United States Supreme Court, in which he stated, “federal judges uniformly understood that the right protected by the text was limited in two ways: first, it applied only to keeping and bearing arms for military purposes, and second, while it limited the power of the federal government, it did not impose any limit whatsoever on the power of states or local governments to regulate the ownership or use of firearms.” (Barrett)
It is no secret that President Barack Obama feels strongly about regulations on gun control. In an audio clip a question and answer episode President Obama publicly stated that, the fact that this society has not been willing to take some basic steps to keep guns of...


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...r waiting periods before a person is allowed to purchase a gun, the process to obtain their Concealed Handgun License and only allowing a certain amount of ammunition a person may have in their possession has some Americans believing that it will allow the government to eventually demolish the right to bear arms completely. State and Federal Laws prohibit certain individuals from obtaining firearms under The Gun Control Act of 1968. ("18 U.S. Code § 922 - Unlawful acts") That means people who obtain guns illegally are usually individuals who do not care about harder gun control regulations. In conclusion, the problem with these regulations are that the American people who are passionate about the 2nd Amendment and properly obtain guns legally are the ones who feel that even though they abide by the rules already they are the ones being punished with more regulations.

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