The Amendment Of The Fourteenth Amendment Essay

The Amendment Of The Fourteenth Amendment Essay

Length: 957 words (2.7 double-spaced pages)

Rating: Better Essays

Open Document

Essay Preview

               The 15th Amendment was an law added to the United States Constitution in 1870 that gave citizens the right to vote no matter their race, skin color, or previous conditions of servitude. This specifically applied to African American males who, though technically were citizens under the 14th amendment, were still being oppressed and restricted from voting. According to Angela Davis in her text, while some feminist activists in the 19th century supported this amendment, others were adamantly opposed to it. These activists were both males and females and many of them had been or were distinguished figures in the abolitionist movement. Supporters argued that African American men had as much of a right as anyone to vote and shouldn 't be denied that right simply because women were, while antagonists argued that until women obtained the right to vote, neither should African American men. Needless to say, the 15th amendment was a topic of controversy among feminists in the 1860s up to its ratification on February 3, 1870.
               Those feminist activists who supported the 15th amendment argued that, while yes, females should have the right to vote, it was first important to give African Americans the right to vote. Even though African Americans were now free and considered citizens thanks to the 13th and 14th amendments, they were still severely oppressed. While technically they had more rights and opportunities in the United Sates government than females, they did not truly receive them. As Frederick Douglass said over and over again in support of the 15th amendment, the abolishment of slavery did not eradicate racism. It was still a huge problem in America. Abolishment had been achieved in name and name only, becau...


... middle of paper ...


...o with their new power. She uses this statement for the argument that the 15th amendment was unjust and shouldn’t be passed. I, however, would argue that the point she attempted to make actually supported those feminists who did want the amendment passed. For African Americans, slavery and oppression are still fresh in their minds the amendment was ratified. It is my belief that because they knew what it is like to be oppressed, African American males would have been the perfect representatives for sexual equality in politics. Take Frederick Douglass for example, he was an African American male in the 19th century who was a prominent abolitionist as well as a feminist activist. While he did see equality for African Americans as a greater importance and pushed for the ratification of the 15th amendment, he also heavily supported equality for women in the United States.

Need Writing Help?

Get feedback on grammar, clarity, concision and logic instantly.

Check your paper »

The Amendment Of The Fourteenth Amendment Essay

- ... In events like the 2016 presidential election, Hillary Clinton significantly won the popular vote, which the people chose and still lost to Donald Trump who won the electoral votes. The 22nd Amendment is not undemocratic and should be kept because it does not deprive voters of their right to elect who they see and feel is the best to run the country. 1Electoral Collegehttp://www.dictionary.com/browse/electoral-college?s=t Dec. 1, 2016 The 22nd Amendment opens the candidate pool because its stops the previous two term presidents from running again....   [tags: President of the United States]

Better Essays
868 words (2.5 pages)

The Amendment Of The Fourteenth Amendment Essay

-                The 15th Amendment was an law added to the United States Constitution in 1870 that gave citizens the right to vote no matter their race, skin color, or previous conditions of servitude. This specifically applied to African American males who, though technically were citizens under the 14th amendment, were still being oppressed and restricted from voting. According to Angela Davis in her text, while some feminist activists in the 19th century supported this amendment, others were adamantly opposed to it....   [tags: Black people, African American, American Civil War]

Better Essays
957 words (2.7 pages)

The Amendment Of The Fourteenth Amendment Essay

- ... ("National Constitution Center") The citizenship This is also called Naturalization Clause; this is in the section one. The state of citizenship and the US clause conferred, is the birth for all the individuals who were born in the US but they don’t have the subject to the power of foreign, before the additional of 14th amendment, the citizens from the states look for attentively to be of United States (Epps). The amendment formally assurance for certain condition to be fulfilled that is anyone naturalized or even born in United States by the jurisdiction will be the US citizen....   [tags: United States Constitution]

Better Essays
1039 words (3 pages)

The Fourteenth Amendment Act Of The United States Essay

- ... District Judge Ronald M. Whyte wrote in his preliminary decision, “The plaintiffs have shown at least that serious questions are raised concerning the States ' ability to restrict minors ' First Amendment rights in connection with exposure to violent video games, including the question of whether there is a causal connection between access to such games and psychological or other harm to children.” Whyte eventually ruled for the plaintiffs and held that the law went against their first amendment right and there was not enough proof that violent video games alter children’s behavior....   [tags: First Amendment to the United States Constitution]

Better Essays
2637 words (7.5 pages)

The Fourteenth Amendment Essay

- The extents of the Fourteenth Amendment to the Constitution has been long discussed since its adoption in mid-late 1800s. Deciding cases like Brown v. Board of Education and Roe v. Wade has been possible due to mentioned amendment. These past cases not only show the progression of American society, but also highlights the degree of versatility that is contained within the amendment. Now, in 2015, the concerns are not of racial segregation or abortion, the extent of the amendment was brought to a new field: same-sex marriage....   [tags: United States Constitution]

Better Essays
730 words (2.1 pages)

Essay about The Fourteenth Amendment Of The United States

- The Thirteenth Amendment of the Constitution of the United States was the first amendment added to the Constitution immediately after the Civil War. The Thirteenth Amendment officially outlawed slavery. The Thirteenth Amendment was adopted December 18, 1865 which says, “Section 1: Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a punishment for crime whereof the party shall have been duly convicted, shall exist within the United States, or any place subject to their jurisdiction. Section 2: Congress shall have power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation.” This amendment is the most important amendment of the Reconstruction Amendments....   [tags: United States Constitution, American Civil War]

Better Essays
822 words (2.3 pages)

Due Process Of The Fourteenth Amendment Essay

- Due Process is a fundamental, constitutional guarantee that all legal proceedings will be fair and that one will be given notice of the proceedings and an opportunity to be heard before the government acts to take away one’s life, liberty, or property. Also, a constitutional guarantee that that a law shall not be unreasonable, arbitrary, or capricious (The Free Dictionary). Due process of law is found in both the Fifth and Fourteenth Amendments. The Due Process Clause of the Fifth Amendment, which was ratified in 1791, applies to the federal government and the Due Process Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment was ratified in 1868 and applies to state government....   [tags: Supreme Court of the United States]

Better Essays
1320 words (3.8 pages)

Essay on The Fourteenth Amendment and Equality Under the Law

- The Fourteenth Amendment and Equality Under the Law The Fourteenth Amendment was adopted in 1868 as one of the longest amendments to the Constitution with five parts in total. The most significant part is section one. In the very first sentence of section one, . All persons born or naturalized in the United States and subject to the jurisdiction thereof, as citizens of the United States and of the state where in they reside. citizenship was universalized. The Amendment was designed to prohibit state governments from curtailing the rights of former slaves after the Civil War, however it has been used to grant all of the personal liberties and rights conveyed in the Bill of Rights....   [tags: Papers 14th Amendment History Essays ]

Better Essays
776 words (2.2 pages)

The Fourteenth Amendment Essay

- On a date that will be remembered forever as a step forward for our nation, July 28, 1868, the Fourteenth Amendment became part of the U.S. Constitution. The Fourteenth Amendment gave a new sense of hope and inspiration to a once oppressed people. It was conceived to be the foundation for restoring America to its great status and prosperity. The Amendment allowed “equal protection under the law”, no matter what race, religion, sex, sexual preference or social status. It was designed to protect the newly freed slaves....   [tags: Racism Equality Constitution Essays]

Better Essays
762 words (2.2 pages)

Fourteenth Amendment to the US Constitution Essay

- The Fourteenth Amendment What amendment to the United States constitution is considered to be illegally ratified. What amendment both grants the right to vote to men and then takes away that right to vote. If you answered the fourteenth amendment to both questions you would be right. Although most people think of the fourteenth amendment as being a "civil rights" amendment, it also defines citizenship, voting rights, and states congressional representatives and electors numbers. In this paper I will talk about how the passage of the fourteenth amendment was a relevant event in history, how it impacts our country today, how it is viewed as the civil rights amendment in our textbook, how it h...   [tags: Political Science]

Free Essays
1434 words (4.1 pages)